Documents filed under Noise

Pilot study: Wind turbine infrasound damage extends for 15 kilometers

Syte-pilot-study-2016-2_thumb The pilot study carried out in Satakunta and Northern Ostrobothnia in Finland shows that the damage caused by infrasound from wind power plants will only decrease significantly more than 15 kilometers away from wind turbines. The study was carried out by the Finnish Association for Environmental Health (SYTe) in the spring 2016. A portion of the study's results is provided below. The full report (in English) can be found at the document links on this page.
19 Feb 2019

Audiologist Jerry Punch PhD public comments Seneca Wind

Seneca-wind-jerry-punch-letter-to-opsb_thumb Audiologist Dr. Jerry Punch, a professor emeritus in the Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, submitted comments in regard to a wind energy facility before the Ohio Power Siting Board. Dr. Punch's comments focus on the impacts of wind turbines noise on human health. A portion of his comments are provided below. His complete letter can be downloaded at the links on this page.  
15 Jan 2019

Health Canada’s Wind Turbine Noise and Health Study—A Review Exploring Research Challenges, Methods, Limitations and Uncertainties of Some of the Findings

396097169-health-canada-s-wind-turbine-noise-and-health-study-a-review-exploring-research-challenges-methods-limitations-and-uncertainties-of-some-of-the-find_thumb This important paper examines the highly touted Health Canada study that looked at wind turbine noise and its impact on human health. The authors cite serious limitations of the Health Canada methodology and the failure of Health Canada to honor its original intention of releasing the raw data for other researchers to confirm and test Health Canada's findings. Readers are encouraged to read this paper closely before accepting the reported findings of the Health Canada study.
20 Dec 2018

Riina I. Bray MD: Impacts of wind turbines on human health

Riina_bray_iwt_ontario-letter_thumb Dr. Riina Bray, the Medical Director of the Environmental Health Clinic at Women’s College Hospital, Associate Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine and former Chair of the Environmental Health Committee of the Ontario College of Family Physicians submitted this letter to the Premier of Ontario, The Honorable Doug Ford, addressing the health concerns related to wind turbines. The letter is provided below. The full letter including all references can be accessed at the links on this page.
28 Nov 2018

Letter to Falmouth: Wind 2 turbine and noise

Rand_acoustics_re_windii_relocation-study_181026_thumb This important letter to the Town of Falmouth (Massachusetts) explains how the relocation of the Wind 2 turbine would result in continued noise violations. The author, Robert Rand, an acoustician experienced in turbine noise, warned that the turbine would need to be situated at least 2923 feet from the nearest neighbor in order to remain in compliance with governing noise regulations. The letter is posted below and accessible by clicking the document icon on this page. The supporting evidence is included with the document.
26 Oct 2018

Using residential proximity to wind turbines as an alternative exposure measure to investigate the association between wind turbines and human health

Barry-etal-residential-proximity-wind-turbine-human-health-canada_thumb This important paper has found living close to wind turbines "is negatively correlated with self-rated environmental quality of life and physical health quality of life." The finding is consistent with other studies cited in the paper. The authors also found that turbine noise alone is not the only factor. Other factors may include "visual sight, vibrations, shadow flicker, sub-audible low frequency sound, or mechanisms that include individual subjective experiences and attitudes towards wind turbines." The results of the paper are posted below. The full report can be downloaded by clicking the links on this page.
6 Jun 2018

Ambrose: Courts Uphold Wind Turbine Noise Limits

Letter_to_wind_action_group_-_8dec2017_thumb This important letter by acoustician Stephen Ambrose explains how two separate court decisions, one in Massachusetts and the other in Michigan, together provide clarity on what the minimum protective noise limits should be when siting industrial wind energy facilities. Mr. Ambrose's letter includes links to the two decisions as well as supporting background information. The content of the letter is shown below. The original can be downloaded from this page.
8 Dec 2017

Decision: Tuscola Wind III v Almer Township MI

Tuscola_iii_v_almer_township_order_thumb This important decision by US District Court Judge Thomas L. Ludington addresses two arguments proffered by the wind industry. The first relates to the industry's argument that noise standards for limiting turbine noise emissions that are based on Lmax are not reasonable. The second discusses the argument that restricitve ordinances, in this case an Lmax noise limit, are de facto exclusionay zoning. Judge Ludington takes both claims on and finds the wind company's arguments are without merit. A portion of the decision is provided below. The full decision can be downloaded from this page.
3 Nov 2017

Wind Turbine Syndrome: The Impact of Wind Farms on Suicide

Turbine_zou201710_thumb This new report examines how locations where industrial wind turbines were erected near residences experienced measurable upticks in suicide. The researcher identifies three indirect tests of the role of low-frequency noise exposure including those most vulnerable to the noise, prevailing wind direction and potental of greater noise impacts, and turbine noise resulting in sleep deficiency. The abstract and conclusion of the paper are provided below. The full report can be accessed by clicking the links on this page.
30 Oct 2017

Infrasound from wind turbines is a new signal in the environment

Infrasound-aunio-group-34_2017-1_thumb FINLAND. Aunio Group Oy from Oulu has developed a device for measuring and recording infrasound produced by wind turbines. The measurement equipment can be used to produce research data for investigating the characteristics of infrasound and where it spreads, and to analyze any health problems it may cause. The infrasound produced by wind turbines differs from infra-sounds occurring in nature; according to measurements the infrasound produced by wind turbines is a clear signal - distinguishable from ambient noise in the environment. This paper describes the method of evaluating the Anuio Group's device and the results. The full paper can be accessed by clicking the links on this page.
5 Oct 2017

Status: Aramini-Krogh project to evaluate Health Canada Wind Turbine Noise and Health Study

Stats_canada_health_canada_raw_data_project_update_july_2017_thumb In November 2014, Health Canada released the results of its $2.1 million “Wind Turbine Noise and Health Study.” Despite public anouncements from Health Canada that the raw data originating from the Study would be made available, the data continues to be inaccessible making it impossible to validate the conclusions drawn by Health Canada researchers. For example, HC found high levels of annoyance but concluded no association to turbine noise.
30 Jul 2017

A possible criterion for wind farms

Schomer_2017-a_possible_criterion_for_wind_farms_thumb The purpose of this paper is to explain and evaluate the metric by which the community response to wind turbine noise is gauged and the limits appropriate to that response function. Chapter II deals with selection of the metric, and Chapter III presents the data and methods used to establish criteria and a criterion, based on the metric selected. The abstract of the paper is provided below. The full paper can be accessed by clicking the links on this page.  
22 Jun 2017

A new methodology for investigating ILFN complaints

Subjectarea10_cooper_1013_3659_thumb This important study has identified flaws in the current compliance testing for wind turbine noise and further outlined the methods necessary for identifying and measuring the low-frequency, pulsation that isoften times reported by those impacted by the turbines. Specifically, the "presence of amplitude modulation in the low frequency region, that modulates at an infrasound rate, at or near the threshold of hearing" has been identified and may support the symptoms reported by Dr. Nina Pierpont in her work, Wind Turbine Syndrome. The introduction and conclusion of the paper is provided below. The full paper can be accessed by clicking the links on this page. 
18 Jun 2017

Altered cortical and subcortical connectivity due to infrasound administered near the hearing threshold – Evidence from fMRI

Journal.pone.0174420-infrasound_thumb The findings of this study  demonstrate that infrasound near the hearing threshold may induce changes of neural activity across several brain regions, some of which are known to be involved in auditory processing, while others are regarded as keyplayers in emotional and autonomic control. In other words, sound that is not audible can still trigger a response in the human brain.
12 Apr 2017

Rand: Critique of Noise Impact Report for NextEra's Golden West Wind Energy Center

Rand_review_epsilon-4177-goldenwest-170321_thumb NextEra's Golden West Wind Energy Center sited in El Paso County, Colorado was required under the County permit to conduct a noise impact study after the project was placed in service in October 2015. Acoustician Robert Rand was asked by residents living near the turbines to review the noise impact study as prepared by NextEra consultant, Epsilon Associates. Mr. Rand's report, included here, identified several material errors with Epsilon's report and also found that the project appears to be operating outside the noise limits permitted by the County and the State. The Golden West Wind Energy Center consists 145 1.72-megawatt GE turbines for a total installed capacity of 249.4-megawatts Mr. Rand's executive summary is provided below. The full report can be accessed by clicking the document icon on this page. 
23 Mar 2017

Comments by the Academic Editors Regarding: “Evaluation of Quality of Life of Those Living near a Wind Farm“:

Ijerph-14-00141-v2-mroczek_thumb These papers document an important debate between wind-friendly academics who argue that those living near wind turbines benefit from the experience and those who insist such conclusions are backed by inappropriate study methodologies and broad assertions that cloud actual findings. In this circumstance, Dr Daniel Shepherd a PhD in psychoacoustics and head of research at AUT University in Auckland, New Zealand, challenges the methods and conclusions of Mroczek et al.’s “Evaluation of Quality of Life of Those Living near a Wind Farm“ published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2015, 12, 6066–6083. The academic editors of the Journal, after granting Mroczek the opportunity to respond, agree with Shepherd's main criticisms. In total, there are four papers documenting this debate; three are attached to this page. These include Shepherd's critique, Mroczek's response and the position of the Journal's academic editors. Portions of the response by the Journal's editors are also provided below.
8 Mar 2017

Response to McCunney et al.: Wind turbines and health: An examination of a proposed case definition

Response_to_mccunney-wind_turbines_and_health_thumb  Dr. Robert Y McMurtry and Carmen M. E. Krogh published this response to commentary contained in the presentation of McCunney et al. McCunney et al. addressing wind turbine noise and the impacts on nearby residents. A portion of the response is provided below. The full response can be accessed by clicking the document links on this page.
16 Dec 2016

http://www.windaction.org/posts?topic=Noise&type=Document
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