Library filed under Offshore Wind

Fishing groups seek Atlantic wind farm delay

The petition, filed Thursday in federal court in Washington, D.C., said the plan to build as many as 194 turbines in a 127-square-mile section would hurt fishermen who now cruise the area looking for scallops and squid and others who harvest fish species including summer flounder, mackerel, black sea bass and monkfish.
12 Dec 2016

Fishermen hit feds with lawsuit over wind lease sale

The filing alleges that the leasing process for BOEM did not adequately consider the impact the proposed New York Wind Energy Area would have on the region’s fishermen. According to the FSF, the site is in the waters of the New York Bight on vital, documented scallop and squid fishing grounds, which serve as essential fish habitat and grounds for other commercially important species, including black sea bass and summer flounder.
9 Dec 2016

Patterns of migrating soaring migrants indicate attraction to marine wind farms

Patterns_of_migrating_soaring_migrants_indicate_attraction_to_marine_wind_farms_thumb This important research identified that migrating raptor species tend to be attracted to offshore wind turbines and that the risk of colliding with wind turbines at sea is much greater than previously assumed. The abstract and resulting discussion of the paper are provided below. The full paper can be downloaded by clinking the links on this page. 
29 Nov 2016

Lack of sound science in assessing wind farm impacts on seabirds

Lack_of_sound_science_in_assessing_wf_impacts_seabirds-jpe12731_thumb This paper argues that the methods and data used when estimating effects of offshore wind turbines on seabird population rates and the potential impacts on seabird populations are grossly inadequate. As a result,  Environmental Impact Assessments cannot solely be relied on to report risks. The conclusions cited in the paper are provided below. The full paper can be accessed by clicking the links on this page. 
16 Sep 2016

The nation’s first offshore wind farm is ready to go, despite critics’ blowback

Mary Jane Balser, who owns Block Island Grocery, typically the island’s biggest electricity consumer, is even more blunt. For years she tried to win grants to connect the island to the mainland electricity grid in an effort to escape the unreliability of diesel generators. “Financially,” she said this month, the wind farm “just makes no sense.”  Rhode Islanders will pay more for power to subsidize a project benefiting Deepwater’s private investors, Balser said. “It’s not benefiting Block Island. It’s not benefiting Rhode Island. The notoriety of being the first in the nation? Can I take that home and eat it?”
29 Aug 2016

http://www.windaction.org/posts?p=7&topic=Offshore+Wind
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