Documents filed under Impact on Landscape

Coalition for Wisconsin Environmental Stewardship initial brief regarding proposed Glacial Hills wind facility

Cwestinitialbrief_thumb The Coalition for Wisconsin Environmental Stewardship("CWESt") opposes the application of Wisconsin Electric Power Company ("WEPCO") for a certificate of public convenience and necessity ("CPCN") to construct a wind electric generation facility to be known as the Glacier Hills Wind Park ("Glacier Hills"). First, the project would be a threat to human health and safety because of wind turbine noise and shadow flicker. Second, the project would substantially and unfairly reduce real property values. The Commission may not issue a CPCN without first determining that the project would promote the public health and welfare. Application of Wisconsin Electric Power Company for a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity to Construct a Wind Electric Generation Facility and Associated Electric Facilities, to be Located in Fond du Lac County, Docket no. 6630-CE-294 (2007) (following Clean Wisconsin, Inc. v. Public Service Commission of Wisconsin, 2005 WI 93, ¶ 35). The evidence shows that, rather than promote the public health and welfare, this project threatens it. The full brief can be accessed by clicking on the link at the bottom of this page.
24 Nov 2009

Energy sprawl or energy efficiency: Climate policy impacts on natural habitat for the United States of America

Energysprawlorenergyefficiency_thumb Concern over climate change has led the U.S. to consider a cap-and-trade system to regulate emissions. Here we illustrate the land-use impact to U.S. habitat types of new energy development resulting from different U.S. energy policies. We estimated the total new land area needed by 2030 to produce energy, under current law and under various cap-and-trade policies, and then partitioned the area impacted among habitat types with geospatial data on the feasibility of production. The land-use intensity of different energy production techniques varies over three orders of magnitude, from 1.9–2.8 km2/TW hr/yr for nuclear power to 788–1000 km2/TW hr/yr for biodiesel from soy. In all scenarios, temperate deciduous forests and temperate grasslands will be most impacted by future energy development, although the magnitude of impact by wind, biomass, and coal to different habitat types is policy-specific. Regardless of the existence or structure of a cap-and-trade bill, at least 206,000 km2 will be impacted without substantial increases in energy efficiency. ...The possibility of widespread energy sprawl increases the need for energy conservation, appropriate siting, sustainable production practices, and compensatory mitigation offsets.
17 Sep 2009

New Jersey DEP letter to Delsea Energy

Nj_depletterdelseaoffshore_thumb New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection scientists have opposed wind energy development in the Delaware Bay, which could cut down an Ocean County firm's plans for 106 wind turbines there. Delsea Energy continues to push for the project and has applied for the right to measure wind and other bay-related data that could lead to the turbines' construction there. However, DEP scientists and the Atlantic Flyway Council have raised concerns about the effect the project would have on wildlife. A DEP assistant commissioner wrote last month "that the Delaware Bay is not an appropriate area for development of wind energy." Scott Brubaker, the DEP's assistant commissioner for land use management, informed Delsea Energy in this Aug. 20 letter "that the Delaware Bay is not an appropriate area for development of wind energy." The full letter with attachments can be accessed by clicking on the link below. Follow-up e-mails between the wind developer and NJ DEP can also be accessed.
20 Aug 2009

Wyoming Governor Freudenthal's letter to the State's Wind Energy Task Force

Wyoming's Governor Dave Freudenthal wrote this letter to the legislative Wind Energy Task Force formed in the 2008-2009 session. The Task Force will be studying various aspects of the legal framework surrounding wind energy development including state statutes related to industrial siting and the authority of the Public Service Commission; federal statutes related to state and county authorities and other issues pertaining to wind energy development and its associated transmission infrastructure. The Governor is very clear that environmental concerns will not take a back seat to wind development and that a balance between land uses is essential.
18 May 2009

Oregon’s high desert and wind energy: opportunities and strategies for responsible development

The Oregon Natural Desert Association (ONDA) and five other conservation groups released this report in response to the growing pressure to site renewable energy projects on open desert land in Oregon. While the ONDA supports renewable energy development and believes that such development can help reduce fossil fuel consumption and create sustainable economies for rural communities, the organization sees an urgent need to analyze where wind power potential is the highest and wildlife and social conflicts are the lowest. The analysis is important in ensuring projects can be developed without degradation of desert wildlands and damage to sensitive wildlife populations. This report was created through the mapping and analysis of the areas identified by the US Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory as having the best wind power potential. This data is compared with sensitive natural resources such as Greater sage-grouse breeding areas. The report includes a narrative outlining the nature of the potential conflicts with wind energy development as well as Best Practices and guidelines to minimize impacts.
1 May 2009

US Fish and Wildlife Service comments on Noble Environmental's proposed wind facility in Coos County

Usfws_letter_coosnoblenh_090312_thumb This letter to the US Army Corps of Engineers details the deficiencies in Noble Environmental Power's application to build a 99-megawatt wind energy facility in Coos County, New Hampshire. The US Fish and Wildlife Service makes a powerful case for why a full Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) should be undertaken in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).
12 Mar 2009

US EPA comments on Noble Environmental's proposed wind energy facility in Coos County

03-11-09_-_letter_from_the_usepa_thumb This letter to the US Army Corps of Engineers details the deficiencies in Noble Environmental Power's application to build a 99-megawatt wind energy facility in Coos County, New Hampshire. The US Environmental Protection Agency makes a powerful case for why a full Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) should be undertaken in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).
11 Mar 2009

Nature Conservancy of NH comments regarding Coos County wind proposal

Tnc_comments_granitereliable_3_9_09.final2_thumb The Nature Conservancy of New Hampshire submitted the below comments to the New Hampshire Site Evaluation Committee in response to a proposal pending before the committee. The proposal, known as the Granite Reliable Power (GRP, LLC) Wind Park, seeks to erect thirty-three 3.0MW turbines along the Kelsey, Owlshead, and Dixville peaks located in Coos County, NH. GRP, LLC is owned by Noble Environmental Power.
10 Mar 2009

Audubon Society of NH comments regarding Coos County wind proposal

090227nh_audubon_letter_thumb The Audubon Society of New Hampshire submitted comments to the New Hampshire Site Evaluation Committee in response to a proposal pending before the committee. The proposal, known as the Granite Reliable Power (GRP, LLC) Wind Park, seeks to erect thirty-three 3.0MW turbines along the Kelsey, Owlshead, and Dixville peaks located in Coos County, NH. GRP, LLC is owned by Noble Environmental Power.
27 Feb 2009

Wilderness Society and Center for Biological Diversity comment on Deerfield Wind DEIS

11-28-08_final_tws_cbd_deis_deerfield_wind_comments_wo_signs_thumb The Wilderness Society and the Center for Biological Diversity submitted these joint comments toe the U.S. Forest Service in response to the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the Deerfield Wind Project. Click here to access the Forest Service DEIS. The comments submitted can be downloaded by clicking on the link at the bottom of this page.
28 Nov 2008

WV-PSC decision: AES Laurel Mountain, LLC wind energy proposal

Psc_final_order_-1-_thumb At a session of the PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF WEST VIRGINIA in the City of Charleston on the 26th day of November, 2008. CASE NO. 08-0109-E-CS AES Laurel Mountain, LLC, a limited liability company, Arlington, Virginia. Application for a siting certificate to authorize the construction and operation of a wholesale electric generating facility in Barbour and Randolph Counties, West Virginia. The full order can be downloaded by clicking on the web link at the bottom of this page.
26 Nov 2008

Brief of evidence by Dr Dave Bennett called by the Tararua-Aokautere Guardians Inc.

Drdavidbennettnoise_thumb In October 2006, Palmerston North City Council and Horowhenua District Council received land use consent applications from Motorimu Wind Farm Limited to construct, operate and maintain 129 wind turbines as part of a proposal known as the ‘Motorimu Wind Farm’. In June 2007, consent was granted for 75 of the proposed turbines to be constructed with consent declined for the remaining 52 turbines. Motorimu appealed the decision arguing it needed all 129 turbines for the project to be viable. This month the Environmental Count granted Motorium permission to erect up to 80 turbines. Dr. Dave Bennett's testimony was entered into the record before the Environment Court.
8 Oct 2008

Forest clearing at the NedPower wind facility, WV

Beforeafterforest_destruction_at_nedpower_windwv_thumb This document provides before and after aerial photos of the very southern end of the NedPower wind facility, the most recently constructed wind energy facility in the mid-Atlantic region. The project is comprised of 132 2-MW Gamesa wind turbines, each nearly 400 feet tall. Extensive clearing of forest was done to install the turbines and other project infrastructure. The average width of the area bulldozed for road corridor varies from about 75 to 100 feet.
1 Oct 2008

Assessment Review Board of Ontario orders property value reduction

Assessmentreviewdecisionthompson_thumb In 2008, the Municipal Property Assessment Corporation ('MPAC') assessed the 1,320-square-foot house owned by Paul Thompson at $255,000. Mr. Thompson, sought a reduction in the house value from MPAC due to noise from Canadian Hydro Developers' transformer station built 360 meters from his front door. The station services the nearby Melancthon I wind energy facility consisting of 133 wind turbines located in Melancthon and Amaranth townships in Ontario Canada. Thompson was denied the reduction and he appealed to the Assessment Review Board ('ARB'). The ARB found in favor of Mr. Thompson's appeal and issued an order to reduce the assessment of his property to $127,000, a 50% drop in value. The report found "There is evidence that noise contaminations exists without any apparent cure." The documentation explaining the property value reduction can be accessed by clicking on the link at the bottom of this page.
12 Sep 2008

Wind power in Virginia: Overstated benefits, understated costs

Overstated_benefits_understated_costs_thumb This brochure provides a quick, but informative, summary of the key issues pertaining to wind energy development in Virginia and the Appalachian region. The document can serve as a start point for others preparing similar information materials for their community. Click on the link(s) at the bottom of this page to view the final layout including photos.
1 Jun 2008

Cowperthwaite letter to Roxbury, ME residents

Cowperthwaiteletter_marshill_thumb We had heard about the windmills but when we asked how they would affect us if we bought the land, the town manager told us we wouldn't even see them, much less hear them because they were going on the front of the mountains. We believed them. That was our biggest mistake. At that time we had no idea that the town fathers had not even read the application that they had co-signed on or hired a lawyer to explain it to them. They had no idea what they had agreed to. They, in turn, had believed everything UPC had told them. The biggest lie of all was that there would be no noise or you had to be within 500'.to hear anything. I believe that is still in their propaganda. ...A close friend of ours wanted to buy ten acres of land from us for a house lot. After he saw what was happening he decided he definitely did not want to live with the windmills in his front yard. Sadly, we agreed with him.
10 Apr 2008

http://www.windaction.org/posts?p=3&topic=Impact+on+Landscape&type=Document
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