Library filed under Impact on Wildlife

Developing Methods to Reduce Bird Fatalities in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area

Wind turbines in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA) provide on average 1.1 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) of emissions-free electricity annually, enough to power almost 200,000 average households per annum, but these turbines also kill birds that are legally protected, and have been doing so for decades. This five-year research effort focused on better understanding the causes of bird mortality at the world's largest wind farm. Researchers studied 2,548 wind turbines and combined their data with results from 1,526 wind turbines they had studied previously. They sought to: (1) quantify bird use, including characterizing and quantifying perching and flying behaviors of individual birds around wind turbines; (2) evaluate flight behaviors and the environmental and topographic conditions associated with them; (3) identify possible relationships between bird mortality and bird behaviors, wind tower design and operations, landscape attributes, and prey availability; and (4) develop predictive, empirical models that identify turbine or environmental conditions that are associated with high vulnerability. Researchers concluded that bird fatalities at the APWRA result from various attributes of wind turbine configuration and placement, and that species-specific behavior plays a large role in how each contributory factor affects mortality. The report details numerous specific observations. Researchers identified and evaluated possible measures to mitigate bird mortality in the APWRA. They offer recommendations to discontinue or modify some current management actions, to implement new ones immediately, and to experiment with others. Data presented in the report support these recommendations. The results suggest that repowering with carefully placed, modern wind turbines mounted on taller towers may be the preferable means to substantially reduce bird mortality.
1 Aug 2004

Wind power or horse power?

"WALES has some of the most breathtaking riding country in Britain, but it has sometimes been slow to capitalise on its tourism potential. This is starting to change, and in North Wales plans for horse holidays with grant backing are well underway." Ann West relates: "But when they were ridden along a bridlepath towards the windmills, the horses became upset by the noise and the big moving shadows of the blades on the ground. I was worried for the riders' safety so we turned back after passing just two windmills."
24 Jun 2004

Wind turbines don't make good neighbors

Researched and written by Eleanor Tillinghast of Green Berkshires Inc. this is a comprehensive study of the probable impact of industrial wind plants on the rural character, quality-of-life and economy of the Berkshires in western Massachusetts. Specific issues addressed include visual aesthetics, tourism, property values, public roads and public safety.
14 May 2004

Memorandum to the Riley County Planning Board (KS) regarding the placement of industrial wind turbines in the Kansas Flint Hills

Although my research started with the visual and spatial aspects of WECSs, and continues to be focused on WECSs effects on “landscape character” i.e. impacts on the spatial environment, with implications for cultural values and social systems of our region. I am equally concerned about the predictable negative effects of WECSs on the natural systems of the Flint Hills. I am concerned about serious cumulative effects and the degradation of: the visual character of our environment; the social fabric of communities that are facing the prospect of WECS-C; the health of biological, ecological components of our regional ecosystem; and the long term viability of our local, increasingly “nature-based” economy.
1 Mar 2004

Comments pertaining to the accuracy and completeness of the Kittitas Valley Wind farm Project DEIS

Efsecdeis-robertsontestimony_thumb This document [DEIS] has not provided any demonstrable public need for the insignificant amount of power this facility is capable of producing. No valid, compelling local (or even statewide) economic reasons were offered to potentially offset the overwhelming negative impacts that will result if built. This DEIS is abundant in quantity, but extremely lacking in quality of scientific analysis and entirely deficient in analysis in certain areas. Various mitigations offered are unacceptable or unworkable. The following are areas of analysis that were either deficient or not performed at all:............
1 Dec 2003

Wedge-tailed Eagle Mortality at Starfish Hill

F1000004_-2-_thumb This Wedge-tailed Eagle was found by a group on a visit to the 23 turbine Starfish Hill wind farm in September 2003. It was taken to a Vet who discovered it had so many broken bones and internal injuries that it had to be put down. Two weeks later a second Wedge-tailed Eagle was killed at the same wind farm. This one was found with its head cut off. A third Wedge-tailed Eagle has since been killed. A Wedge-tailed Eagle was killed at Woolnorth in Tasmania and another at Codrington in the western district. Numerous other birds have been killed at these wind farms. The following link is to a related Eagle Hawk Action Group press release http://www.windaction.org/news/1823
1 Sep 2003

New Jersey Audubon Society's Position Paper On Wind Power Energy

Audubon_1__thumb New Jersey Audubon Society (NJAS) and its 20,000 members generally support environmentally-responsible renewable energy sources, such as wind power, photovoltaic cells, geothermal and hydro-fuel cells. Because traditional energy sources contribute to global climate change, habitat change and degradation, smog pollution, mercury contamination in our waterways, and radioactive waste, NJAS recognizes the importance of developing emission-free sources of energy. However, we are concerned about the potential impacts of these developing technologies on wildlife, and natural habitats.
1 Jul 2003

Groups Call for Review of Wind Power Wildlife Impacts

Wind_power_wild_life_impacts_thumb More than 25 national and regional conservation groups, including Defenders of Wildlife, National Audubon Society, the Humane Society of the United States, and the Endangered Species Coalition, today called on Interior Secretary Gale Norton and other federal officials to assess the impacts of planned extensive wind power development on Appalachian mountain ridges on migratory birds, before these projects are constructed. In a letter to Secretary Norton and others, the groups cited documented bird kills by existing wind turbines in the region, and urged the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to develop appropriate criteria for siting and construction of these facilities under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, which makes it illegal to kill migratory birds.
24 Jun 2003

USF&WS Letter to Nebraska Public Power District re. Possible Threats Posed by Ainsworth Wind Plant to Wildlife

Usfws_letter_to_nppd_thumb The attached pdf file contains a letter written by Steve Anschutz, Nebraska Field Supervisor of the USF&WS, to Rockford Plettner, Environmental Specialist Water/Natural Resources of Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD). The letter responds to a NPPD request for input regarding the possible construction of a wind farm south of Ainsworth, Brown County, Nebraska. The letter's comments are provided as technical assistance and predevelopment consultation....
18 Apr 2003

http://www.windaction.org/posts?p=2369&topic=Impact+on+Wildlife
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