Articles

Environmental agency opposes permit for wind project

But biologists at the Natural Resources Agency were not convinced. They worry that turning blades on the 328-foot-high turbines will kill migrating birds and bats. The wind developers failed to do studies that would allow the agency to conclude the project will not have an undue harmful impact on wildlife, the agency said.
26 Nov 2005

UPC Wind's claims disputed

There are no definitive, objective studies of effects of wind energy projects on property values; however, real estate agents recognize and agree that properties with significant natural views have premium value and intrusions on these views erode value. Read all the references to "beautiful view" in real estate ads. People care greatly about view and buy accordingly.
26 Nov 2005

A friend of bats and people

If it does come down to making a choice, bats or humans, obviously we are going to choose humans. But in choosing humans, we also are counting on human ingenuity to preserve and protect our fellow tenants on the earth. True enough, it's a fine line, a razor's edge. But if we don't walk this particular path, then we all will end up walking on a paved sidewalk in a concrete jungle, instead of in a world where - in some places - things grow green.
24 Nov 2005

Trouble on Green Mountain

In June, Austin-based Green Mountain Energy Company – self-described as "one of the nation's largest retail providers of cleaner electricity products," generated from sources such as wind, solar, water, biomass, and natural gas – announced the crosstown relocation of its headquarters from aquifer-sensitive west Austin to an award-winning green office tower downtown, in anticipation of growth and expansion. By the time the move was complete, however, the energy provider had discontinued servicing about 480,000 customers in Ohio and Pennsylvania, laid off 15% of its workforce, and found itself facing suit in federal court. Green Mountain blames regulatory and market obstacles for its woes, but its critics cite an over-reliance on natural gas and a lack of investment in the very clean energy sources the company has made its trademark.
24 Nov 2005

Let's stop tilting at windmills

Yet the Government (UK) tilts, irrelevantly, at windmills. Why? Because the only way to combine efficient generation with lower CO² emissions involves nuclear power and no one wants to be the first to say so.
24 Nov 2005

Industrial-scale wind farms are coming to Ontario, but regulated electricity prices and a lack of siting policy are still holding things back

It is still expensive, for one. Liddle put generating costs alone at nine to 11 cents per kilowatt-hour. This in a province where residential users pay a regulated price of five and 5.8 cents per kilowatt-hour, depending on use-though in recent months industrial power users have been paying market prices of eight to ten cents per kilowatt-hour for their power. It is also unreliable. Power production depends on how the winds blow: turbines turn off when wind speeds fall below four metres per second, or when they exceed 25; they produce the most power at wind speeds of 18 metres per second.
24 Nov 2005

The Eiffel Tower it is not

Many of us rely on the beauty of our hills and farms and a business that grows yearly. Please stop chasing the buck. Ide is acting like a real estate broker for big wind and some things (like our hills) should not be for sale.
23 Nov 2005

Residents speak out against wind farm

More than 700 Greenbrier County residents have sent letters to the state Public Service Commission, opposing a plan to build one of the largest wind-power projects east of the Mississippi River. The residents say the wind turbines will spoil mountain views, decrease property values, kill bats and birds, hurt tourism and ruin hunting and fishing in the area. They predict the wind turbines will catch fire during lightning strikes. And they say the turbines will interfere with emergency radio communications.
23 Nov 2005

Wind energy holds potential but faces barriers

"To push harder for renewables, we need to have data in order to do it responsibly," said Bull. "In the meantime, while we're doing this, we're focused on wind energy and natural gas costs and pushing utilities beyond where their comfort level is. We'll continue to push for more renewables where we see the benefits to consumers."
23 Nov 2005

Conservation is the key to energy debate

Saying "no" to industrial wind development on Vermont ridge lines is not the same thing as saying "yes" to nuclear power plants. Mr. Dewey is either confused or deliberately making untrue statements for his own purposes.
23 Nov 2005

http://www.windaction.org/posts?p=2168&type=Article
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