Library filed under Taxes & Subsidies from Vermont

Funding announced for clean energy projects

Alternative energy projects ranging from home solar systems to dairy farm methane projects are collectively $1.3 million richer thanks to state-required funding from Entergy Nuclear, the owner of the state's nuclear power plant. Of the $1.3 million, $500,000 is slated for the 3-year-old Vermont Solar and Small Wind Incentive Program, which provides grants for solar electric, small wind and solar hot water systems for residences and businesses.
20 Jul 2006

Big Money from Big Wind

Suppose you wanted to make a bundle in the electric energy business in the little state of Vermont. How would you go about it? The old-fashioned way would be to generate electricity at a lower cost than your competitors. But forget that – too demanding. Here’s another way: get the federal and state governments to rig the deal in your favor.
11 Jul 2006

Who Will Pay Sheffield's Tax Bonanza?

To begin with, UPC would have absolutely no interest in wind energy if they weren't in line to receive enormous tax subsidies to do it. Wind energy from Vermont ridgelines hasn't a possibility of being produced at competitive prices with even the most expensive of traditional energy sources. Without the subsidies, wind energy in Vermont is an economic joke.
10 Jul 2006

Draft 2004 New England Marginal Emission Rate Analysis

Marginalemissionrateanalysis_thumb ...the MEA Report can be used to estimate the value (avoided emissions) of Renewable Energy Certificates (REC) by providing both REC suppliers and stakeholders with information that can be used to communicate the environmental benefits of RECs and works to enhance the overall REC marketplace. Editor's Note: As noted below under Methodology [emphasis added], this report appears to substantiate the point that wind energy would not backdown "baseload" generation.
28 Feb 2006

Wind not a stormy issue in Readsboro, Searsburg

READSBORO — Officials from the two towns most affected by a proposed wind facility met on Wednesday night to discuss the economic impacts of a 30-turbine development. The Readsboro and Searsburg Select Boards met in the Central School gym to discuss the financial benefits and strains that can be expected by a town hosting a wind farm. Robert Ide of the Vermont Department of Public Service attended, as did about 10 residents. Searsburg is now the home of the state's only existing commercial wind facility. There are 11 turbines producing about 6 megawatts of electricity. A 30- to 45-megawatt plant with 20 to 30 new turbines has been proposed for ridgelines spanning both Readsboro and Searsburg.
17 Nov 2005

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Vermont&p=3&topic=Taxes+%26+Subsidies
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