Library filed under General from USA

Major step on wind energy

Xcel says wind power will mostly supply intermittent and peak power - energy demands that fluctuate day to day or even hour to hour. Unfortunately, that means it still must rely on coal, the most polluting fossil fuel, supplemented by natural gas, the most expensive fossil fuel, for its base load (the kind of electricity that's always on).
3 Jan 2006

Enormous wind towers a poor power choice

This battle has been fought for decades, first with the billboard campaign, again with the "ridgeline" highway campaign, and now with enormous industrial turbines. In our hearts we believe the Legislature and the governor will protect our state's beauty and our heritage as our forefathers, legislators and governors before us.
1 Jan 2006

Grid Impacts of Wind Power Variability: Recent Assessments from a Variety of Utilities in the United States

Ewec06gridpaper_thumb In this report we discuss some recent studies that have occurred in the United States since our previous work [2, 3]. The key objectives of these studies were to quantify the physical impacts and costs of wind generation on grid operations and the associated costs. Examples of these costs are (a) committing unneeded generation, (b) allocating more load-following capability to account for wind variability, and (c) allocating more regulation capacity. These are referred to as “ancillary service” costs, and are based on the physical system and operating characteristics and procedures. This topic is covered in more detail by Zavadil et al. [4].
1 Jan 2006

Grid Impacts of Wind Power Variability: Recent Assessments from a Variety of Utilities in the United States

Ewec06gridpaper_thumb In this report we discuss some recent studies that have occurred in the United States since our previous work [2, 3]. The key objectives of these studies were to quantify the physical impacts and costs of wind generation on grid operations and the associated costs. Examples of these costs are (a) committing unneeded generation, (b) allocating more load-following capability to account for wind variability, and (c) allocating more regulation capacity. These are referred to as “ancillary service” costs, and are based on the physical system and operating characteristics and procedures. This topic is covered in more detail by Zavadil et al. [4].
1 Jan 2006

Grid Impacts of Wind Power Variability: Recent Assessments from a Variety of Utilities in the United States

Ewec06gridpaper_thumb In this report we discuss some recent studies that have occurred in the United States since our previous work [2, 3]. The key objectives of these studies were to quantify the physical impacts and costs of wind generation on grid operations and the associated costs. Examples of these costs are (a) committing unneeded generation, (b) allocating more load-following capability to account for wind variability, and (c) allocating more regulation capacity. These are referred to as “ancillary service” costs, and are based on the physical system and operating characteristics and procedures. This topic is covered in more detail by Zavadil et al. [4].
1 Jan 2006

Grid Impacts of Wind Power Variability: Recent Assessments from a Variety of Utilities in the United States

Ewec06gridpaper_thumb In this report we discuss some recent studies that have occurred in the United States since our previous work [2, 3]. The key objectives of these studies were to quantify the physical impacts and costs of wind generation on grid operations and the associated costs. Examples of these costs are (a) committing unneeded generation, (b) allocating more load-following capability to account for wind variability, and (c) allocating more regulation capacity. These are referred to as “ancillary service” costs, and are based on the physical system and operating characteristics and procedures. This topic is covered in more detail by Zavadil et al. [4].
1 Jan 2006

Grid Impacts of Wind Power Variability: Recent Assessments from a Variety of Utilities in the United States

Ewec06gridpaper_thumb In this report we discuss some recent studies that have occurred in the United States since our previous work [2, 3]. The key objectives of these studies were to quantify the physical impacts and costs of wind generation on grid operations and the associated costs. Examples of these costs are (a) committing unneeded generation, (b) allocating more load-following capability to account for wind variability, and (c) allocating more regulation capacity. These are referred to as “ancillary service” costs, and are based on the physical system and operating characteristics and procedures. This topic is covered in more detail by Zavadil et al. [4].
1 Jan 2006

Selling out: A different shade of green

In this season of hope and reflection, a time to give thanks for our treasures and consider helping those less fortunate - I would urge us all to pause a moment, look around and appreciate the beauty of this community and consider protecting and preserving the natural green space we have left. Resist the temptation for that 'greedier shade of green'!
30 Dec 2005

Industrial Wind Tops News From NEK In 2005

In December, Gov. Jim Douglas joined the ranks of those opposed to commercial wind farms on ridge lines, saying the huge structures are not compatible with Vermont's image. Specifically, he said he does not support the proposed UPC Vermont Wind project with 26 398-foot turbines planned for ridges in Sheffield and Sutton.
30 Dec 2005

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=USA&p=896&topic=General
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