Library from South Dakota

Wind 'corridor' could speed projects

The corridor follows the crane's migratory path from Canada to the Texas coast, and tracking the project to this central flyway was the whole point, said Marty Tuegel, a planning coordinator in the Fish and Wildlife's southwestern region.
2 Aug 2011

Wind power fails to sail in S.D.

Developers point to the usual culprit - a longstanding lack of adequate transmission - but also to a prolonged slump in electricity demand, sluggish growth in the broader economy and rock-bottom prices for natural gas, which competes with wind.
18 Jul 2011

They toil not, neither do they spin

Nothing illustrates the distance between the political culture and reality in modern governments so much as the billions invested in wind power. Presumably the purpose of such investments is to a) reduce greenhouse emissions and b) reduce dependence on fossil fuels. The plain fact that it increases both seems not to have bothered anyone.
10 Apr 2011

Fickle turbine winds

As a wind-turbine factory in Pipestone, Minn., lays off most of its workers, competitors in South Dakota and Iowa are booming. ...The stark differences among the three Midwestern manufacturers show how business can blow hot and cold in what is still a young and growing wind-power industry.
29 Dec 2010

Wind turbines becoming fixture of Wessington Springs horizon

All of the tax credits that help wind power become affordable to consumers are directed in hopes of having tax benefits, but the cooperatives don't pay taxes and haven't been eligible. But as part of the federal stimulus package, the Treasury Department created a renewable energy grant program that provided an opportunity for South Dakota Wind Partners to develop a community-based wind project so average people could invest.
20 Dec 2010

Harnessing wind to help economy

South Dakota's wind energy industry is confident that if given the right incentives, short-term production gains would be a boon for the state's economy, and in 15 years, the state could be producing 10 times as much energy from wind as it is today. ...Not everyone shares this optimistic view. "Your state is being used because it has land," was the blunt assessment of Lisa Linowes, executive director of the New Hampshire-based activist group Wind Action. Linowes said the wind industry's economic forecasts typically don't take into account higher utility rates or the unreliability of wind as a power source. That the industry has potential to expand is a testament to years of government preference, not merit, she said.
1 Dec 2010

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=South+Dakota&p=7
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