Library from Michigan

Michigan Siting Guidelines for Wind Energy Systems

Michigan_wind_siting_guidelines_final_thumb These guidelines have been developed by the Energy Office, Michigan Dept. of Labor and Economic Growth to assist local governments to develop siting requirements for wind energy systems. These guidelines are not intended to apply in urban areas that already have height, noise, setback and other requirements that can be applied to wind energy systems. These guidelines have been developed with the intention of striking an appropriate balance between the need for clean, renewable energy resources and the necessity to protect the public health, safety, and welfare. The guidelines represent recommended zoning language for local governments to use if they amend their zoning ordinance to address wind energy systems. The Energy Office, DLEG has no authority to issue regulations related to siting wind energy systems.
14 Dec 2005

Wind hearing postponed until Dec. 22

BAD AXE — Circuit Court Judge M. Richard Knoblock Wednesday adjourned a hearing requesting an injunction to prevent Huron County from issuing any building permits for wind turbines after attorneys for Residents for Sound Economics and Planning and Noble Energy agreed to postpone the hearing until Dec. 22.
8 Dec 2005

RSEP seeks injunction to halt wind turbine construction

BAD AXE — Residents for Sound Economics and Planning have filed a lawsuit against Huron County and Clerk Peggy Koehler, asking the court to issue an injunction that would stop the construction of wind turbines in the county until a referendum could be held on the zoning ordinance passed by the county board of commissioners during the summer.
1 Dec 2005

Wind power for the birds? Turbine blades can be lethal for birds and bats

Sometimes it's not easy being green. Proponents say Michigan is ideal for wind generation, a Green Power energy source that is pollution free and self renewing. But some worry that spinning wind turbine blades up to 85-feet long could be lethal scythes for migrating birds, especially if, as some predict, wind generation gathers steam in Michigan.
29 Nov 2005

WTG, what's the point

No electrical power plant manager/scheduler who wants to keep their job will ever lower the output of a reliable and dispatchable fossil or nuclear fuel plant by placing their faith in the wind. So the net effect, after we've exposed our tourism industry, our property values and children's well being to these WTGs, is that they will yield little if any usable electricity.
11 Nov 2005

War of the Winds

"Suffering from migraines and sick of suburban life, real estate agent Dawn Deel fled the outskirts of Detroit three years ago to build a new life in Golden Township, Oceana County, on Lake Michigan's eastern shore..... Deel, however, now has a different sort of headache. Alternative-energy companies Michigan Wind Energy and Machinaw Power plan to build dozens of wind turbines-290 ft tall white steel pinwheels- across the county." Glenn Schleede's (10/26/05) letter (False Claims in Time 'War of the Winds' article) is available in 'Opinions'.
31 Oct 2005

Michigan: House Bill 4648

Michigan_house_bill_2005-hib-4648_1__thumb THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF MICHIGAN ENACT: SEC. 16J. (1) AS USED IN THIS SECTION, A "WIND ENERGY SYSTEM" OR "SYSTEM" MEANS A WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEM. (2) A WIND ENERGY SYSTEM SHALL BE PERMITTED IN ALL ZONING 3 CLASSIFICATIONS SUBJECT TO ALL OF THE FOLLOWING REQUIREMENTS:"
25 Apr 2005

Land Use and Zoning Issues Related to Site Development for Utility Scale Wind Turbine Generators

Land_use_and_zoning_issues_thumb Shadow Flicker Shadow flicker is caused by the sun rising or setting behind the rotating blades of a turbine. The shadow created by the rotating blades can cause alternating light and dark shadows to be cast on roads or nearby premises, including the windows of residences, resulting in distraction and annoyance to the residents. A related phenomenon, strobe effect, is caused by the chopping of sunlight behind moving blades, similar to the effect of the setting sun behind trees when driving along a roadway in the winter. Both of these phenomena are factors in the visual impact of a wind turbine project, and some argue that they are a threat to health and safety. They could also be considered a nuisance to nearby property owners.
19 Jan 2004

Otsego County Planning Commission White Paper: Land Use Issues of Wind Turbine Generator Sites

Otsegowindlfnoise_thumb Low Frequency Noise Low frequency noise is generated at very low frequencies, generally accepted to be at levels below 100 Hz and the audible range. There is presently no commonly accepted metric or standard for measurement, although several have been proposed or used in specific situations. Low frequency noise has been associated with wind turbine developments, as well as road, rail, sea and air traffic and other industrial applications such as cooling towers. It creates a large potential for community annoyance, and it is most often experienced inside of homes and buildings where resonance amplifies the sound, which is less easily heard outside. Because the frequencies are so low, the noise is often “felt” as a vibration or a pressure sensation. Reported effects include annoyance, stress, fatigue, nausea and disturbed sleep. Low frequency noise can be a factor at much greater distances from the noise source than audible noise. A case study in North Carolina in the 1980’s near a wind turbine installation documented low frequency noise problems at residences located over ½ mile from the turbine.2 While the phenomenon was originally believed to be associated with the older, down-wind designed turbines, the problem persists with newer wind farms. It has received particular attention in Denmark, and has been a topic considered in the UK, Scotland and Wales through a commissioned government project in 2001.
19 Jan 2004

Land Use Issues of Wind Turbine Generator Sites- Ice Throw

Otsegowindicethrow_thumb Ice throw is a concern related to the fact that any object at the end of the rotating blades is traveling at a high rate of speed. In the case of a 60 meter turbine (about 200’ diameter), rotating at 20 RPM, the tip of the blade is traveling at just over 140 mph. If the turbine diameter increases to 80 meters, the tip speed increases to just over 187 mph. There are reports of ice having accumulated at the tip of the turbine and upon breaking loose, traveling significant distance......
19 Jan 2004

Kelly Alexander's Home, Machinaw City: Photo and Map re. Noise

Snoisyhouse_thumb Kelly Alexander believed that windpower would be a good energy source. He was told the machines were not noisy. No one told him about the blade flicker that shines even through closed blinds or the low frequency noise that penetrates his home with doors and windows tightly closed and storm windows installed. Recently, the turbine owner visited Kelly and asked what he could do to help the situation. He said, “Stop lying about these turbines. Tell people the truth.”
1 Dec 2002

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Michigan&p=62
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