Library filed under Energy Policy from Ireland

Wind energy is not the answer to Ireland’s emission problem

The wind industry continues to operate a ruthless cloak-and-dagger, divide-and-conquer strategy. “Community gain funds” and payouts have resulted in disharmony and disagreement among neighbours, sometimes causing major family fallouts. Turbine construction is governed by out-dated planning guidelines ...which allow them just 500m from homes, sometimes resulting in devastating consequences for families. 
6 Mar 2017

Wind power report ‘needs to be implemented’

The recommendation for Northern Ireland to revamp its whole approach to wind farms is “long overdue”, according to campaigners. They were reacting to a major report by Stormont’s environment committee this week, which called for a tightening up of planning rules around such developments.
6 Mar 2015

Wind Power Reassessed: A review of the UK wind resource for electricity generation

Adamsmithinstitute-windassessment_thumb The UK wind debate assumes that wind farms operate at roughly their average output most of the time. According to this new paper by Dr. Capell Aris’, this assumption is not true. Power comes only extremely intermittently and variably and there are long periods of negligible efficiency, particularly during the long winter months when power is most needed. A 10GW wind fleet would need approximately 9.5GW of fossil capacity to guarantee its output. A summary from the report of Dr. Aris' findings is provided below. The full report can be accessed by clicking the links on this page.
27 Oct 2014

Tensions between British government parties over energy policy blamed for wind deal collapse

A change in EU policy which has scaled back mandatory renewable energy targets from 2020 has also changed the emphasis from wind energy. “Energy is now top of the agenda in the UK. The British government policy on energy is in an absolute state of dysfunction. There is a battle between the two parties [Conservatives and Liberal Democrats],” the negotiator said.
8 Mar 2014

Massive wind farm plans look likely to be shelved

An agreement between the Irish and British governments to permit power to traded between the two countries is now unlikely to go ahead, effectively shelving scores of windfarms across the midlands region. The lack of agreement will be good news to residents who had mounted huge opposition to the plans in areas where large-scale wind farms were due to be developed.
7 Mar 2014

Work begins on turbines as energy companies predict an ill wind

Environmentalists say targets for renewables, energy savings and the climate are all essential and have been proved to work. But energy suppliers argue that generous subsidies for renewable sources have distorted the market, while they have had to close down gas-fired power plants because they cannot compete. "The risk of black-outs has never been higher."
26 Oct 2013

Sales in our wind: Ireland's ambitious wind-energy plans

It is "far too soon" to make final judgments on which of the export-orientated windfarm projects now being mooted will be approved and under what terms. "There is no fait accompli at this stage. None of this has reassured objectors, who are concerned about the noise and visual impact of onshore turbines and also see the export of wind energy to Britain as equivalent to "selling the family silver".
7 Apr 2013

Ireland's big hope or just hot air?

A forthcoming report by the Irish Academy of Engineers (IAE) expresses alarm at the lack of any comprehensive analysis of the costs of the country's current energy policy, while multinationals and other businesses remain deeply concerned about the potential costs of the Government's commitment to generating 40 per cent of our electricity from wind power.
25 Feb 2011

Ideology is driving our energy policy instead of economic reality

Last week the Irish Academy of Engineering (IAE) called for a halt on a proposed €30bn spend on the national energy infrastructure so that a proper assessment of future energy needs as well as the economic benefit of the massive investment in renewable power could be addressed. ...Plans are now afoot to deliver up to 7,800 MW of wind power on the island of Ireland, with a mixture of onshore and offshore projects in the pipeline. It may well help reduce our carbon emissions, but at what cost?
2 Jul 2009

Oriel developer frustrated at planning barriers

The developer of one of the most ambitious wind farm developments in Ireland has expressed frustration at the planning process for renewable energy projects. Brian Britton is co-founder and managing director of Oriel Windfarm, which hopes to build an offshore wind farm with 55 turbines off the north-east coast close to Dundalk. The project has been under development for four years and is at the final stage of the planning process.
29 Mar 2009

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Ireland&p=2&topic=Energy+Policy
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