Library filed under Structural Failure from Germany

Vestas wind turbine catches fire in Germany, no injuries

Vestas Wind Systems A/S (VWS), the world's largest wind-turbine maker, said a V112 3.0-megawatt turbine caught fire today at the Gross Eilstorf wind farm in Lower Saxony, Germany. No injuries were reported. The cause of the 3 p.m. blaze hasn't been determined ...The turbine, a new model for Vestas, was disconnected from the grid and three nearby V112 turbines were shut for safety reasons, it said.
30 Mar 2012

Vestas turbine blade shredded

Lightningdestroysturbine1_20090702_thumb A fierce storm on the afternoon of July 2, 2009 destroyed portions of an industrial wind turbine located between Brieske and Schwarzheide in Germany. Pieces, as shown in this photo, flew 150 meters through the air landing about 50 meters from federal highway Nr. 169. No one was injured. The approximately 40 meter blade broke several trees as it cut a track through the forest. The blade showed signs of lightning damage. The turbine was a Vestas V80- 2MW with a height of 140 meters.
2 Jul 2009

Vestas turbine failure following lightning strike

Lightningdestroysturbine_20090702_thumb A fierce storm on the afternoon of July 2, 2009 destroyed portions of an industrial wind turbine located between Brieske and Schwarzheide in Germany. Pieces, as shown in this photo, flew 150 meters through the air landing about 50 meters from federal highway Nr. 169. No one was injured. The approximately 40 meter blade broke several trees as it cut a track through the forest. The blade showed signs of lightning damage. The turbine was a Vestas V80- 2MW with a height of 140 meters.
2 Jul 2009

The Dangers of Wind Power

After the industry's recent boom years, wind power providers and experts are now concerned. The facilities may not be as reliable and durable as producers claim. Indeed, with thousands of mishaps, breakdowns and accidents having been reported in recent years, the difficulties seem to be mounting. Gearboxes hiding inside the casings perched on top of the towering masts have short shelf lives, often crapping out before even five years is up. In some cases, fractures form along the rotors, or even in the foundation, after only limited operation. Short circuits or overheated propellers have been known to cause fires. All this despite manufacturers' promises that the turbines would last at least 20 years.
24 Aug 2007

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Germany&p=4&topic=Structural+Failure
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