Documents filed under Offshore Wind from Europe

Offshore wind strike prices: Behind the headlines

Offshorestrikeprice_thumb The new report prepared by economics professor Gordon Hughes, a former advisor to World Bank, Dr Capell Aris, a fellow of the IET, and Dr John Constable of the Global Warming Policy Forum, explains how the broad assumption that offshore wind prices are falling is not valid. Through a detailed statistical analysis of the data, covering 86 wind farms, the authors found that capital cost of offshore wind (£/MWh installed) is actually rising as a consequence of companies moving into deeper and deeper waters. The summary of the report is provided below. The full report can be downloaded from this page.
10 Nov 2017

Patterns of migrating soaring migrants indicate attraction to marine wind farms

Patterns_of_migrating_soaring_migrants_indicate_attraction_to_marine_wind_farms_thumb This important research identified that migrating raptor species tend to be attracted to offshore wind turbines and that the risk of colliding with wind turbines at sea is much greater than previously assumed. The abstract and resulting discussion of the paper are provided below. The full paper can be downloaded by clinking the links on this page. 
29 Nov 2016

Lack of sound science in assessing wind farm impacts on seabirds

Lack_of_sound_science_in_assessing_wf_impacts_seabirds-jpe12731_thumb This paper argues that the methods and data used when estimating effects of offshore wind turbines on seabird population rates and the potential impacts on seabird populations are grossly inadequate. As a result,  Environmental Impact Assessments cannot solely be relied on to report risks. The conclusions cited in the paper are provided below. The full paper can be accessed by clicking the links on this page. 
16 Sep 2016

Sound exposure in harbour seals during the installation of an offshore wind farm: predictions of auditory damage

Hastie_et_al-2015-journal_of_applied_ecology_thumb Scientists at the Sea Mammal Research Unit at the University of St Andrews tracked 24 harbor seals and their behavior while offshore wind turbines were being installed on the east coast of England, in 2012. They predicted that half of the seals tracked received sound levels from pile driving that exceeded auditory damage thresholds. The results have implications for offshore industry and will be important for policymakers developing guidance for pile driving. A summary of the findings is provided below. The full paper can be accessed by clicking the links on this page.
1 May 2015

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Europe&topic=Offshore+Wind&type=Document
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