Library from Canada

CanWEA Letter Detailing Wind Turbines' Energy Consumption

Letter_to_the_oeb_jan_06_thumb In times of low wind, or during maintenance, a wind turbine will consume a small amount of power to run computers, communications, hydraulics, yaw motors, heaters and radiator fans. When a turbine is generating, its power curve (or rated output) is net of power consumption, so it does not draw power from the grid at that time. Commercial scale wind turbines produce power 70-80% of the time, with output ranging from a small amount to the full rated capacity of the turbine. A typical wind turbine will produce 100 times more power than it consumes in a given month. Its consumption and peak load are very small. A 1.8 MW turbine may have peak load of 27kW, with a resting consumption of as low as 5 kW. Wind turbines are principally suppliers of power to the system, and any consumption is purely incidental. As such, wind turbines are not typical demand customers and should not be treated as other loads.
18 Jan 2006

Magenn Power announces distribution agreement

OTTAWA, ONTARIO, Jan 10, 2006 Magenn Power Inc. today announced a distribution agreement with Krystal Planet Corporation to market the Magenn Air Rotor System (MARS), an airborne tethered wind generator. This innovative new product will deliver up to 4 kW (kilowatts) of power at a cost per kWh (kilowatt-hour) potentially much lower than conventional wind turbines mounted on towers.
10 Jan 2006

Wind Power 2005 in Review, Outlook for 2006 and Beyond

North American wind power is expected to see a more than fourfold increase in wind power plants in operation by 2010. The US is expected to grow from just over 6,700 MW to over 28,000 MW by 2010. Starting from a lower base of nearly 450 MW in 2004, Canada's wind power base will grow even more quickly to over 6,200 MW by 2010. Editor's Note: This article highlights an optimistic view of wind energy growth largely driven by current and anticipated tax subsidies (e.g. production tax credits) and the creation of artificial markets (e.g. renewable portfolio standards). Both are the result of political polices that promote an energy source that is neither responsive to base load energy needs nor effective in reducing greenhouse gases.
6 Jan 2006

Industrial-scale wind farms are coming to Ontario, but regulated electricity prices and a lack of siting policy are still holding things back

It is still expensive, for one. Liddle put generating costs alone at nine to 11 cents per kilowatt-hour. This in a province where residential users pay a regulated price of five and 5.8 cents per kilowatt-hour, depending on use-though in recent months industrial power users have been paying market prices of eight to ten cents per kilowatt-hour for their power. It is also unreliable. Power production depends on how the winds blow: turbines turn off when wind speeds fall below four metres per second, or when they exceed 25; they produce the most power at wind speeds of 18 metres per second.
24 Nov 2005

New energy storage facilities could take the wind out of the sails of the intermittency debate

If the wind isn't blowing at peak times, the argument goes, then the wind turbines are not contributing to the power in the grid. However, if wind farms could store all the power they generate at off-peak times, during the night for example, and then control the way and time it is released, it would not only enhance the revenue streams they could receive, but also remove the intermittency claims. Now, a Canadian energy management firm claims to be able to do just that. EPOD International has secured two pilot projects with wind power developers in Canada and the US to test their proprietary energy storage system, the EMT.
19 Nov 2005

WEO shows rising energy demand to 2030

But world energy resources are adequate to meet this sustained growth trend because global oil reserves today exceed the cumulative projected production to 2030, IEA said. This optimistic outlook, however, is based on a reference scenario that IEA describes as "unsustainable." Under that reference scenario, primary world energy demand increases by an average rate of 1.6%/year, with fossil fuels accounting for 83% of the projected increase. By 2030, the world consumes 16.3 billion tonnes of oil equivalent (toe)/year—5.5 billion toe more than it does today—with more than two thirds of energy use coming from developing countries.
15 Nov 2005

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Canada&p=182
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