Library from California

Stop squandering California's energy resources

The plant's operators and the environmental groups who orchestrated the shutdown intend to fill the energy gap left by Diablo Canyon's closure with wind and solar power, as well as conservation initiatives. Even if they make good on those promises, the transition will come at a high cost -- particularly to low-income Californians already struggling to keep their lights on.
14 Aug 2016

Thorny issues challenge California's commitment to renewable energy goals

“There is a regressive nature to some of these things,” Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom said Friday, noting that more than 1 million state households spend more than 10% of their income on energy. “We have to be sensitive to issues relating to energy costs.” ... renewable energy goals will require going far beyond putting up new wind turbines and solar array farms. 
16 Jul 2016

Good news or bad? Solar surpasses wind in California

Public records from CAISO (California Independent System Operator) indicate that over the past five years, grid-connected, utility-scale solar generation in California increased 15-fold -- from a total of 1,000 GWh in 2011 to 15,592 GWh in 2015, composing 6.7 percent of the system total and surpassing wind for the first time, which made up 5.3 percent of the system total.
29 Apr 2016

Feds OK huge, controversial solar project near Mojave preserve

That Environmental Impact Statement assumed that Bechtel would be able to use existing transmission lines on the site to get power from Soda Mountain to Los Angeles. But those transmission lines belong to the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, which announced in June — the same week as the Soda Mountain EIS was released — that it wouldn't be buying power from the project. LADWP said that the project would be too environmentally destructive to justify their becoming a customer. ...And without that transmission, it's unlikely the project will ever obtain a contract with a utility to sell its power.
6 Apr 2016

What will California do with too much solar?

So, Casey is proposing California join up with its neighbors. Instead of having lots of electric grids across the West, each doing their own thing, there would be a larger regional grid, sharing power across state lines. When California has too much solar power, neighboring states would buy it, preventing California from having to switch off the solar farms.
4 Apr 2016

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=California&p=3
back to top