Articles filed under Energy Policy from Asia

Siemens to pay Israel NIS 160m penalty for bribery

German electronics giant has agreed to pay the Israeli government a NIS 160 million penalty for bribing senior Israel Electric Corporation (IEC) (TASE: ELEC.B22) executives to rig a tender for turbines more than ten years ago. Siemens will also appoint an external inspector for supervision over their activities in Israel.
2 May 2016

Japan’s growth in solar power falters as utilities balk

Like other countries that have promoted the technology with generous state support, Japan is also struggling with the financial and technical consequences of its rapid solar growth. Solar power here is costly for consumers because of high state-mandated prices, and handling the fluctuating output of thousands of mostly small solar producers is tricky for utilities. Necessary improvements in the infrastructure have not kept pace, experts say.
4 Mar 2015

Renewable energy sector left high and dry

Apart from a passing mention of the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy’s well-publicised target of 1.75 lakh MW (175,000 MW) of renewable energy capacity, the Budget had absolutely nothing for the sector. The target and the commitments were increasingly seen as unrealistic. The industry had been hoping that some measures would have demonstrated that the targets were not just hot air.
28 Feb 2015

After Fukushima, Japan gets green boom — and glut

Japan has been undergoing a green boom. It's now rapidly turning into a fiasco as the cost proves prohibitive and utilities anticipate putting some nuclear reactors, shuttered since the March 2011 Fukushima disaster, back online. The unfolding green glut in Japan echoes similar experiences in Germany and Spain.
30 Oct 2014

Towards affordable renewable energy

The problem is that the cost-plus tariff system rewards the most corrupt and inefficient proponents. The average is computed on the phony cost claims of such parties and becomes the order of the day. In Wind Power, this factor has come to pervade more so than in other cases. As a result, there is a huge difference between Wind Tariff in Pakistan and almost anywhere. ...The problem is that local professionals are themselves involved in the scam. Who would hire them, if they do not collaborate in the scam? ...What happens is that only the vested interest remains in the tariff award process. Third-party comments (interventions minus stamp paper) remain as a free advice to which nobody is obliged to respond.
27 Apr 2014

Why China’s renewables industry is headed for collapse

China’s green crash is a textbook example of what happens when central planners substitute their economic decrees for the complex supply and demand decisions of a market. Compounding the missteps of China’s green planners was a belief that the West’s love affair with green power was here to stay, despite its higher cost and unreliability. Believing that it could meet the world’s surging demand for solar and wind power, the Chinese state – from the supreme planning agency, the National Development and Reform Commission down to city governments and state-owned banks – gave Chinese manufacturers near-monopoly powers and all-but-free money.
12 Dec 2013

Analysis: High costs keep Japan focus on nuclear

Japan's commitment to restarting many of its 50 idled reactors appears stronger than ever, a year after a previous government said it would begin to phase out nuclear power completely. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who took office in December, says nuclear power remains essential, even with a surge in generation capacity from solar, wind and other renewable sources, and that the world's No. 3 economy cannot afford the mounting costs from importing gas and oil.
15 Sep 2013

Renewable energy push blunted as ad-hoc rules stymie private upstarts

"We have built the minimum necessary facilities, including power transmission lines according to demand, and there are times when connecting (renewable energy sources) is difficult due to capacity issues," an official with Hokkaido Electric said. ...in the absence of grid access rules, utilities often do not reveal how limited their delivery lines actually are or the details of the construction costs for letting providers use their grids.
15 Sep 2013

Wind forecast order jeopardizes industry, Tata Power says

A directive took effect this week ordering wind farms with a capacity of 10 megawatts or more to forecast their generation in 15-minute blocks for the following day. Missing estimates by more than 30 percent will incur penalties. ...The infrastructure can't cope with intermittent wind- and sun-power generation, which has doubled in capacity in five years to almost 20 gigawatts.
16 Jul 2013

Ministry wants competitive bidding for renewable energy procurement

The Ministry of New and Renewable Energy wants to make procurement of electricity from renewable sources also through competitive bidding process, just as in the case of conventional power. ...The Indian wind industry is already in trouble. Two major incentives - generation-based incentive and accelerated depreciation - have been withdrawn from the beginning of the year.
30 Dec 2012

Japan alternative-energy investment stalls

By far the biggest problem in attracting investors is the uncertainty surrounding the details of the government's energy policy, set to be unveiled sometime this summer. Although the government will force electricity companies to buy power from alternative-energy providers, for how many years and at what price isn't yet known. That lack of detail has muted investor interest.
3 Apr 2012

Chinese firm to build big wind farm in U.S.

The administration of U.S. President Barack Obama hopes it can reinvigorate the country's sluggish economy and spur job growth in part by bolstering the U.S. renewable-energy industry. Chinese companies undercut U.S. rivals on price because they get generous subsidies from the Chinese government. Under pressure from the Obama administration, China in June agreed to end many subsidies for its domestic wind-power-equipment manufacturers.
20 Sep 2011

Post-tsunami Japan sticking with nuclear power

The nation seems to be sticking with nuclear power, at least for now. Unlike Germany, which accelerated plans to phase out atomic energy after Fukushima, Japan shows no signs of doing so. In recent days, utilities began newly mandated earthquake and tsunami stress tests, a first step toward restarting reactors idled for maintenance.
10 Sep 2011

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Asia&topic=Energy+Policy&type=Article
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