Library filed under General from Asia

Dhulia, India

Image_4806208_thumb Tax incentives and costly fossil fuels have helped wind energy gain momentum in developing nations – and change rural scenery. Antosh Tila Patil plows a field with his son, Dilip Pantosh, near Dhulia, India.
1 Oct 2006

India and China catch the wind

Wind will remain competitive as long as oil stays above $40 a barrel, said Tulsi Tanti, Suzlon's chairman and managing director; the price has recently dropped to around $60 a barrel. Below $40 a barrel, wind energy may require subsidies to remain cost-effective, or possibly environment-based taxes on oil and other fossil fuels.
28 Sep 2006

Chasing the power of wind in Asia

China and India are accelerating development of wind power, which is luring companies like the turbine maker Vestas Wind Systems as restrictions hamper wind farm construction in traditional markets like Australia. “The biggest markets in the next decade will probably be India and China in particular,” said Achim Hoehne, a manager based in Sydney at the PB Power unit of the engineering services company Parsons Brinckerhoff. “Australia had a good market until about a year ago. Since then, companies are looking for other opportunities.”
20 Sep 2006

Critics call World Bank energy scheme misguided

A World Bank scheme to bring electricity to the world's poor is short-sighted and won't curb climate change or help the people it's aimed at, environmental groups said on Sunday. The Bank released a progress report on Sunday looking at ways to fund cleaner energy projects in some of the world's poorest regions and drive economic growth in those areas. The report, entitled Investment Framework on Clean Energy and Development, says an estimated 1.6 billion people do not have access to electricity. Environmental groups said the Bank was missing a huge opportunity to promote the use of renewable energy by instead backing conventional fossil-fuel based generation.
17 Sep 2006

If we want to help the Third World, let's promote nuclear power

Abundant, reliable, affordable electricity is thus a critical priority for developing nations. Hydroelectric projects offer one solution, coal-fired power plants another. They aren't perfect ecologically, but neither are wind turbines, which require extensive acreage, kill birds, and provide inadequate amounts of intermittent, expensive electricity that cannot possibly sustain modern societies. Now a revolutionary nuclear energy technology is being designed and built in South Africa, but with suppliers and partners in many other nations. The 165-megawatt Pebble Bed Modular Reactors are small and inexpensive enough to provide electrical power for emerging economies, individual cities or large industrial complexes. However, multiple units can be connected and operated from one control room, to meet the needs of large or growing communities.
13 Sep 2006

China speeds up renewable energy development

China's National Development & Reform Commission (NDRC) announced on June 30 a plan to raise consumer electricity rates by 2.5 cents per kilowatt hour (KWH). A tiny fraction of the additional charge, 0.1 cent per KWH, will be used to develop renewable energy (RE), a senior NDRC official told Xinhua a few weeks later. This was unprecedented, the official said. The money would be used to cover the portion of RE development costs that are higher than the average for conventional energies. The practice complies with the principle enshrined in the Renewable Energy Law (REL) that the extra costs of renewable energies should be shared by all end users of electricity across the country.
12 Sep 2006

Alternative energy won’t alter fossil fuel use

“I want to say a word of caution here. I know the excitement [over renewable energy or alternative energy] but it’s not the only solution. Practically, alternative energy would not alter fossil fuel use,” said Medabalmi. He said it is important to note that “the existing power grid will never be completely replaced in the foreseeable future.” As such, he said that, although focus is given on the options presented by alternative energy, the focus must also remain on the stability and reliability of the existing infrastructure.
4 Sep 2006

Nuclear to the rescue - Electricity is the key to a healthier, more prosperous Third World

Abundant, reliable, affordable electricity is a critical priority for developing nations. Hydroelectric projects like Bujagali (Uganda), Narmada (India) and Three Gorges (China) offer one solution; coal-fired power plants another. They aren't perfect ecologically, but neither are wind turbines, which require extensive acreage, kill birds, and provide inadequate amounts of intermittent, expensive electricity that cannot possibly sustain modern societies.
29 Aug 2006

Fluctuation worry sets back wind-generated electricity

Touted as an alternative energy source that does not emit carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, wind power has spread quickly. The combined capacity of wind power turbines nationwide broke the 1-million-kilowatt mark last fiscal year ended March. Regional electric utilities, however, argue that a surge in the supply of wind-generated electricity could degenerate the quality of electricity.
22 Aug 2006

Wind power generation decreasing

But the RPS law has not been effective to increase wind power because electric power companies are negative about such power generation. "Output is unstable because it depends on wind, obstructing stable power supplies," said an executive at a power company.
13 Aug 2006

Scramble for wind power market heats up

The lure of China's huge but underexploited market, the government's drive for renewable energy and low production costs for exports to fast-growing bigger markets in the United States and Europe have foreign and domestic firms rushing to set up wind farms or build production plants across the country.
18 Jul 2006

http://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Asia&p=9&topic=General
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