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Govt sticks to nuke plant

Hudi Hastowo told reporters that while there would be no technical or economic problems with building a nuclear plant, achieving public acceptance would still be difficult. "We'll hold a public awareness campaign, since we don't have any other options to deal with future power shortages (apart from nuclear energy)," he said. "Remote villages may use solar panels or wind turbines but those technologies can't generate the massive amounts of power needed for industry."

The government will continue its efforts to build a nuclear power plant, despite mounting opposition from environmental groups.

"President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono has made it national policy to (start) building a nuclear power plant in 2010 and start operation in 2016," State Minister for Research and Technology Kusmayanto Kadiman said Monday.

"We already have the law and related regulations (in place) to allow the nuclear plant to be constructed."

Kusmayanto spoke to the media after installing Hudi Hastowo as the new chief of the National Nuclear Energy Agency (Batan), replacing Soedyartomo Soentono.

Responding to opposition from environmental groups, the minister said the government would be criticized for any action it took to head off future electricity shortages.

"Some people just want to oppose anything the government does," he said.

"It's been decided by the president so, as a minister, I have to carry out the program. I can only stop the program if the president changes his policy."

Kusmayanto emphasized that Indonesia's nuclear program was for peaceful purposes and was being supervised by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

"We are working... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

The government will continue its efforts to build a nuclear power plant, despite mounting opposition from environmental groups.

"President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono has made it national policy to (start) building a nuclear power plant in 2010 and start operation in 2016," State Minister for Research and Technology Kusmayanto Kadiman said Monday.

"We already have the law and related regulations (in place) to allow the nuclear plant to be constructed."

Kusmayanto spoke to the media after installing Hudi Hastowo as the new chief of the National Nuclear Energy Agency (Batan), replacing Soedyartomo Soentono.

Responding to opposition from environmental groups, the minister said the government would be criticized for any action it took to head off future electricity shortages.

"Some people just want to oppose anything the government does," he said.

"It's been decided by the president so, as a minister, I have to carry out the program. I can only stop the program if the president changes his policy."

Kusmayanto emphasized that Indonesia's nuclear program was for peaceful purposes and was being supervised by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

"We are working closely with IAEA, which will also give us recommendations on where to build the nuclear plant. We still have to study the seismic stability of any site," he said.

Two sites are being mooted for the nuclear plant. One possible site would be near Mt. Muria in Jepara, Central Java, another would be on Madura Island, East Java.

Hudi Hastowo told reporters that while there would be no technical or economic problems with building a nuclear plant, achieving public acceptance would still be difficult.

"We'll hold a public awareness campaign, since we don't have any other options to deal with future power shortages (apart from nuclear energy)," he said.

"Remote villages may use solar panels or wind turbines but those technologies can't generate the massive amounts of power needed for industry."

Meanwhile, Soedyartomo reminded the government to prioritize the use of local materials and manpower in building the nuclear plant.

Indonesia currently has three research reactors in Bandung, Yogyakarta and Serpong, Banten.

 



Source: http://www.thejakartapost.c...

MAR 27 2007
http://www.windaction.org/posts/7986-govt-sticks-to-nuke-plant
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