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Vineyard Wind project in RI moves forward

Rich Fuka, spokesperson for the Rhode Island Fishermen's Alliance, when asked how to balance out the need for renewable energy versus the needs of the fishing industry in Rhode Island, responded by saying, "That's my favorite question. You let the real players, real stakeholders, sit at the table and say, “Look, here's what we have for a fishing industry. Can you move those windmills out further across from the squid stocks?' The answer is: it's not cost effective."

The future of the Rhode Island commercial fishing industry is hanging in the balance, as the proposal to build the massive Vineyard Wind project moved forward.

The media was kicked out of a meeting between the Fisheries Advisory Board Thursday afternoon in Galilee that was presenting the proposed deal with Vineyard Wind to local fisherman that would mitigate the impacts of constructing the offshore $2 billion wind farm.

The media wasn't allowed inside to document the discussions between the Fisheries Advisory Board, appointed by the Rhode Island Coastal Resources Management Council, and local fishermen, that will be impacted by the 84 turbine Vineyard Wind Project.

For comparison, the "test case" Deepwater Wind project that has been up and running for two years off Block Island, has five turbines.

The CRMC has jurisdiction over the federal waters 19 miles from Martha's Vineyard because that's where local fisherman, mainly out of the port of Galilee in Rhode Island, make their living, contributing $400 million a year to the Rhode Island economy.

Rich Fuka, spokesperson for the Rhode Island Fishermen's Alliance, when asked how to balance out the need for renewable energy versus the needs... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

The future of the Rhode Island commercial fishing industry is hanging in the balance, as the proposal to build the massive Vineyard Wind project moved forward.

The media was kicked out of a meeting between the Fisheries Advisory Board Thursday afternoon in Galilee that was presenting the proposed deal with Vineyard Wind to local fisherman that would mitigate the impacts of constructing the offshore $2 billion wind farm.

The media wasn't allowed inside to document the discussions between the Fisheries Advisory Board, appointed by the Rhode Island Coastal Resources Management Council, and local fishermen, that will be impacted by the 84 turbine Vineyard Wind Project.

For comparison, the "test case" Deepwater Wind project that has been up and running for two years off Block Island, has five turbines.

The CRMC has jurisdiction over the federal waters 19 miles from Martha's Vineyard because that's where local fisherman, mainly out of the port of Galilee in Rhode Island, make their living, contributing $400 million a year to the Rhode Island economy.

Rich Fuka, spokesperson for the Rhode Island Fishermen's Alliance, when asked how to balance out the need for renewable energy versus the needs of the fishing industry in Rhode Island, responded by saying, "That's my favorite question. You let the real players, real stakeholders, sit at the table and say, “Look, here's what we have for a fishing industry. Can you move those windmills out further across from the squid stocks?' The answer is: it's not cost effective."

Vineyard Wind has offered local fisherman, through the Advisory Board, $24 million to help safely fish and navigate around turbines, and $6.2 million for claims directly impacted by the project, as well as reducing the scope of the project by 20 percent.

Is there enough compensation in that mitigation plan as it stands to take care of the fisherman?

"No, absolutely not. It's giving the fishing industry away,” Fuka said.

Federal tax credits for Vineyard Wind expire at the end of this year, so they're anxious to get moving.

"The clock is ticking," said Fuka. "They're trying to expedite this project, and the fishing industry is going to be on the receiving end of a failure."

Not so, said Vineyard Wind.

The Rhode Island governor's office said it's important to strike the balance between the need for renewable energy and the Rhode Island fishing industry.

The Fisheries Advisory Board is scheduled to meet with the Coastal Resources Management Council Saturday at 1:15 p.m. to make its recommendation. Then, the CRMC Board votes on whether to give Vineyard Wind its go-ahead on Tuesday.


Source: https://turnto10.com/news/l...

FEB 22 2019
http://www.windaction.org/posts/49479-vineyard-wind-project-in-ri-moves-forward
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