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Poll shows backing for renewable energy initiatives

North Dakotans strongly favor higher electric bills and mandates for ethanol-blended fuel and biodiesel to support renewable energy, says a poll commissioned by the industry's backers.... The poll was conducted by the University of North Dakota's Bureau of Governmental Affairs, using telephone interviews with 600 North Dakota residents. They were conducted from June 13 to July 12. The survey has a margin of error of plus or minus 5 percentage points.

North Dakotans strongly favor higher electric bills and mandates for ethanol-blended fuel and biodiesel to support renewable energy, says a poll commissioned by the industry's backers.

Mike Clemens, of Wimbledon, who is chairman of the North Dakota Renewable Energy Partnership, said the survey's results should be useful during the fall's political campaigns, and for the 2007 Legislature.

"The goal of the survey is for politicians to see ... the pulse of the North Dakota consumer, to find out just really what their feelings are," said Clemens, an ethanol promoter who is a director of the North Dakota Corn Utilization Council. Ethanol is made from corn for use as fuel.

The poll was conducted by the University of North Dakota's Bureau of Governmental Affairs, using telephone interviews with 600 North Dakota residents. They were conducted from June 13 to July 12. The survey has a margin of error of plus or minus 5 percentage points.

It said 69 percent of its respondents would favor a proposal to add a $1 monthly charge to electric bills to help finance renewable energy projects. Eighty-one percent supported requiring utilities to supply at least 10 percent of their electric power... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

North Dakotans strongly favor higher electric bills and mandates for ethanol-blended fuel and biodiesel to support renewable energy, says a poll commissioned by the industry's backers.

Mike Clemens, of Wimbledon, who is chairman of the North Dakota Renewable Energy Partnership, said the survey's results should be useful during the fall's political campaigns, and for the 2007 Legislature.

"The goal of the survey is for politicians to see ... the pulse of the North Dakota consumer, to find out just really what their feelings are," said Clemens, an ethanol promoter who is a director of the North Dakota Corn Utilization Council. Ethanol is made from corn for use as fuel. 

The poll was conducted by the University of North Dakota's Bureau of Governmental Affairs, using telephone interviews with 600 North Dakota residents. They were conducted from June 13 to July 12. The survey has a margin of error of plus or minus 5 percentage points.

It said 69 percent of its respondents would favor a proposal to add a $1 monthly charge to electric bills to help finance renewable energy projects. Eighty-one percent supported requiring utilities to supply at least 10 percent of their electric power from wind turbines and other renewable sources.

Eighty-three percent backed a proposal to require diesel fuel to include a 2 percent blend of biodiesel, which can be supplied by mixing the fuel with soybean or canola oil. The state of Minnesota has a similar mandate.

Seventy-nine percent of the respondents said they backed requiring all North Dakota gasoline to include a 10 percent ethanol blend, which would mimic another Minnesota requirement.

Dennis Hill, executive vice president of the North Dakota Association of Rural Electric Cooperatives, said the group has not decided whether to endorse a surcharge on electric bills to support renewable energy projects.

"There have been lots of discussions about per-month charges on utility bills for all kinds of different programs," Hill said. "It all sounds good on paper, but as you begin to dig down into the details, there's always concerns about the regressive nature. Even $1 a month can be regressive to certain persons."

 


Source: http://www.bismarcktribune....

SEP 14 2006
http://www.windaction.org/posts/4564-poll-shows-backing-for-renewable-energy-initiatives
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