Article

County maps out energy agenda

Weinstein said a county facility management representative will be meeting with the firm Switch LLC to discuss the possibility of bringing alternative forms of energy to the county. After the meeting the county and the company will be conducting a survey of area homes and businesses to see which forms of energy would best meet the county's needs. The meeting will take place in the upcoming weeks and the survey will follow that, according to Weinstein.

LOWER ALLOWAYS CREEK TWP. -- With the rising cost of energy and the prospect of global warming doing increasing harm to the environment, alternative sources of energy are getting more and more attention.

With the unstable conditions in the Middle East, the need to look into alternative sources of energy has become even more important.

The amount of homes, businesses and facilities currently utilizing alternative energy in Salem County is limited, but the county is now beginning to look into other ways to supply the area with energy, according to Salem County Public Relations Officer Robin Weinstein.

Weinstein said a county facility management representative will be meeting with the firm Switch LLC to discuss the possibility of bringing alternative forms of energy to the county.

After the meeting the county and the company will be conducting a survey of area homes and businesses to see which forms of energy would best meet the county's needs. The meeting will take place in the upcoming weeks and the survey will follow that, according to Weinstein.

Weinstein said they haven't begun to investigate how much it would cost to install alternative energy systems or what... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

LOWER ALLOWAYS CREEK TWP. -- With the rising cost of energy and the prospect of global warming doing increasing harm to the environment, alternative sources of energy are getting more and more attention.

With the unstable conditions in the Middle East, the need to look into alternative sources of energy has become even more important.

The amount of homes, businesses and facilities currently utilizing alternative energy in Salem County is limited, but the county is now beginning to look into other ways to supply the area with energy, according to Salem County Public Relations Officer Robin Weinstein.

Weinstein said a county facility management representative will be meeting with the firm Switch LLC to discuss the possibility of bringing alternative forms of energy to the county.

After the meeting the county and the company will be conducting a survey of area homes and businesses to see which forms of energy would best meet the county's needs. The meeting will take place in the upcoming weeks and the survey will follow that, according to Weinstein.

Weinstein said they haven't begun to investigate how much it would cost to install alternative energy systems or what the cost savings of the energy would be.

The facility installed some solar power equipment, but due to the lack of technology available at the time, the system failed.

"The reason was probably because solar power was a novel idea back then and was just being developed," Clour said. "Today, the technology for utilizing solar energy has improved."

Clour said the facility is considering it once again because of the potential cost savings and because of the benefit to the environment.

One place that is successfully utilizing alternative energy is Neptune Farms, which began using solar power in June as a way to cut costs and to protect the environment, according to co-owner Torrey Reade.

"Neptune Farms is an organic farm committed to utilizing alternative sources of energy," Reade said. "It's a benefit to the environment and for economical purposes, it's a very good idea."

Reade said it will save the farm about $4,500 on electricity costs and they plan to make additional money from the solar equipment by selling solar credits to energy supply companies.

The New Jersey Clean Energy Program established that utilities have to purchase a certain amount of energy credits from alternative energy and to use that energy in their operations, Reade said.

Solar energy is particularly valuable in the summer because the sun is readily available and a lot of energy is used because of the use of air conditioners, Reade said.

Although the solar equipment was expensive to install, 62 percent of the cost was covered by the New Jersey Clean Energy Program and 25 percent was covered by a grant from the USDA, according to Reade.

"It's clean, low-maintenance, and it doesn't contribute to greenhouse gases in our environment," Reade said. "It's also not a target for terrorists ... is completely recyclable, and doesn't create any nuclear waste. We're tickled to death with it."

Reade also said the farm is looking into the use of wind power and is currently working in conjunction with Rowan University on a project to test the ability of wind power to provide energy there.

Many grants and programs are available through the New Jersey Clean Energy Program for homes or businesses who want to utilize alternative energy.

Seeing the success such places as Neptune Farms have had with alternative energy and the rising cost of oil and natural gas, its just a matter of time before more people convert to more environmentally friendly ways.

For more information on the New Jersey Clean Energy Program visit their Web site at www.njcleanenergy.com/.
 


Source: http://www.nj.com/news/sunb...

AUG 22 2006
http://www.windaction.org/posts/4099-county-maps-out-energy-agenda
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