Article

Residents oppose power line route

Roberta Campbell, whose property is along segment J of the preferred route, met with several other concerned landowners June 25 at the church. She scheduled the Thursday meeting as well. "The goal is to form a coalition and hire an attorney to present evidence to the PUC," Campbell said.

Pews were filled Thursday night at the First Baptist Church in Paradise.
But the congregation wasn't there for a summer revival.

The church was the gathering spot for landowners who may be affected by the Willow Creek-Hicks 345 kilovolt Transmission Line, which is expected to cross the width of southern Wise County. The route runs from the proposed Hicks switching station near Hicks Airfield Road in Tarrant County to the Willow Creek switching station in Poolville.

The project is a Texas competitive renewable energy zone (CREZ) project, which will integrate wind-produced energy into the market. The line is approximately 40 miles long.

The preferred route follows U.S. 81/287 from the Hicks station to Rhome, then runs parallel and north of Texas 114 until 114 intersects with FM 51. From there, the preferred route makes a horizontal line across the county until it intersects with FM 2123, at which point the line begins to travel southwest to the Willow Creek switching station.

There are 94 alternate segments zigzagging across southern Wise County and portions of Parker and Tarrant counties.

Oncor filed the preferred and alternate route plans with the Texas Public Utility Commission June 16,... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Pews were filled Thursday night at the First Baptist Church in Paradise.
But the congregation wasn't there for a summer revival.

The church was the gathering spot for landowners who may be affected by the Willow Creek-Hicks 345 kilovolt Transmission Line, which is expected to cross the width of southern Wise County. The route runs from the proposed Hicks switching station near Hicks Airfield Road in Tarrant County to the Willow Creek switching station in Poolville.

The project is a Texas competitive renewable energy zone (CREZ) project, which will integrate wind-produced energy into the market. The line is approximately 40 miles long.

The preferred route follows U.S. 81/287 from the Hicks station to Rhome, then runs parallel and north of Texas 114 until 114 intersects with FM 51. From there, the preferred route makes a horizontal line across the county until it intersects with FM 2123, at which point the line begins to travel southwest to the Willow Creek switching station.

There are 94 alternate segments zigzagging across southern Wise County and portions of Parker and Tarrant counties.

Oncor filed the preferred and alternate route plans with the Texas Public Utility Commission June 16, giving landowners until July 16 to file to protest the line or to intervene.

The Wise County Commissioners Court will vote on a resolution stating the county's preferred route at a 9 a.m. Tuesday meeting.

Roberta Campbell, whose property is along segment J of the preferred route, met with several other concerned landowners June 25 at the church. She scheduled the Thursday meeting as well.

"The goal is to form a coalition and hire an attorney to present evidence to the PUC," Campbell said.

Campbell and her brother inherited the land that could be crossed by the line. She said that she's had to deal with pipelines going through her property, but never a transmission line.

"That's different than a 345 kilovolt line," she said.

More than 100 people attended the meeting seeking information.

Lewis Stevens' property is on the preferred route and he has already formed a group with surrounding landowners to fight it. He offered information to the group and encouraged them to file paperwork to intervene.

Stevens warned that the process to become and remain an intervenor is lengthy, tedious and discouraging.

"Being an intervenor is costly and time consuming, but it is the best way to be a part of this," he said.

Stevens explained that once Oncor chooses the route, the affected landowners will be asked for right-of-way through their land.

With the odds seemingly stacked against them, the landowners expressed their dismay at the transmission line potentially coming through their land.

"The people down the road have been there for 25 years," said one man in the audience. "How do you put value on a house you've lived in 25 years and raised your kids in?"

Another admitted that it would be cheaper to accept an original offer for right-of-way rather than fight it.

"It's very scary," Campbell said. "What I try to tell people is you can spend your $1,000 and not win."

But Campbell is dedicated to fighting until the end.

Campbell and Charlie Nelon are heading up the effort to form a coalition. For information, call Campbell at (940) 748-2200 or Nelon at (940) 433-5129.


Source: http://www.wcmessenger.com/...

JUL 3 2010
http://www.windaction.org/posts/27026-residents-oppose-power-line-route
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