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Prison wind turbines plan scrapped to avoid danger to migrating birds

Jerry Sturman, regional manager for energy organisation Partnerships for Renewables (PfR), said: "From a technical perspective, the site is quite promising, but from the outset we knew that ornithology was a key development risk and therefore decided to investigate this issue as a priority.

The proposals would have seen four wind turbines erected at HMP North Sea Camp.

Plans to build wind turbines at a county prison have been scrapped because it is feared that they might harm birds.

The proposals would have seen four turbines erected on the east coast at HMP North Sea Camp - one of the biggest prisons in the county.

But officials have announced that the plans have now been halted after studies revealed the development could affect bird migration routes.

The turbines would have generated enough energy annually to power 4,600 houses in an area rich in wildlife.

Jerry Sturman, regional manager for energy organisation Partnerships for Renewables (PfR), said: "From a technical perspective, the site is quite promising, but from the outset we knew that ornithology was a key development risk and therefore decided to investigate this issue as a priority.

"With initial bird monitoring studies showing that a development on this site would be inappropriate for local bird life, we have decided not to pursue this project any further."

The plans were unveiled in November last year. From the start, officials had... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

The proposals would have seen four wind turbines erected at HMP North Sea Camp.

Plans to build wind turbines at a county prison have been scrapped because it is feared that they might harm birds.

The proposals would have seen four turbines erected on the east coast at HMP North Sea Camp - one of the biggest prisons in the county.

But officials have announced that the plans have now been halted after studies revealed the development could affect bird migration routes.

The turbines would have generated enough energy annually to power 4,600 houses in an area rich in wildlife.

Jerry Sturman, regional manager for energy organisation Partnerships for Renewables (PfR), said: "From a technical perspective, the site is quite promising, but from the outset we knew that ornithology was a key development risk and therefore decided to investigate this issue as a priority.

"With initial bird monitoring studies showing that a development on this site would be inappropriate for local bird life, we have decided not to pursue this project any further."

The plans were unveiled in November last year. From the start, officials had warned that the proposals might not go ahead - with the impact on local bird life at the heart of the debate over whether to proceed.

The blueprints revealed at the time showed that the turbines could lead to annual savings of around 9,400 tonnes of carbon dioxide - and help the Government meet its renewable energy targets.

Prison staff had revealed they were keen to play their part, with prison governor Graham Batchford telling the Echo that climate change was a "serious threat".

But in a statement yesterday, he said: "We have been working with Partnerships for Renewables over the past few months to investigate the prison's potential for generating renewable electricity, as we are keen to play our part in helping the Government meet its targets for renewable energy generation and the reduction of greenhouse gases.

"Although unfortunately the site has been found to be unsuitable for a wind energy development, we are pleased with the investigative work done by PfR and are fully supportive of the decision not to pursue the project any further on environmental grounds."

The National Offender Management Service, which had worked with PfR on the plans, has given its backing to the decision to scrap the turbine plans.

The RSPB has also welcomed the decision.

Philip Pearson, spokesman for the bird protection charity, said: "While we are supportive of wind energy as a way of combating climate change by reducing our reliance on fossil fuels, wind turbines need to be appropriately sited to avoid adverse impacts on wildlife."


Source: http://www.thisislincolnshi...

JUN 18 2010
http://www.windaction.org/posts/26782-prison-wind-turbines-plan-scrapped-to-avoid-danger-to-migrating-birds
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