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Opposing view.

"What they are planing to do is put these things within the view of 30,000 residences and homes all along the 19-460 corridor," Wayne Evans, also of Bluefield, Va., said. "People have to listen and look at these things all day long. To trade the value of our mountains, which is our calling card - if you look at the businesses around here - they all use the mountain logo. West Virginia is the Mountain State. I can't think of no other way to ruin that. It's a no win situation."

BLUEFIELD, Va. - The view of scenic East River Mountain is almost unparalleled from Charles Stacy's front porch.

"You almost have to see it to appreciate it," Stacy, a landowner who is concerned about a proposed large-scale wind turbine farm proposed by Dominion and BP Wind Energy North America for East River Mountain, said. "I am probably one of the most adversely affected as far as eyesight. It (the proposed wind turbine farm) stretches from Bluefield to Springville, and I'm right in front of it. I would probably be able to see three-quarters of the project from my front porch."

Stacy said the wind farm could cause property values to tumble anywhere from 20 to 40 percent.

"That's a tremendous impact," Stacy said. "I'm looking at this two ways. Number one I'm a citizen who will be impacted by the viewshed. Number two, I'm a personal injury lawyer. If all of the information out there is accurate, wind turbines have never been put this close to personal property."

Stacy said wind farms could adversely impact the health of those who live in close proximity to the turbines.

"The formal name they have given to it is wind turbine syndrome," Stacy said. "There are two problems. One is the lack of... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

BLUEFIELD, Va. - The view of scenic East River Mountain is almost unparalleled from Charles Stacy's front porch.

"You almost have to see it to appreciate it," Stacy, a landowner who is concerned about a proposed large-scale wind turbine farm proposed by Dominion and BP Wind Energy North America for East River Mountain, said. "I am probably one of the most adversely affected as far as eyesight. It (the proposed wind turbine farm) stretches from Bluefield to Springville, and I'm right in front of it. I would probably be able to see three-quarters of the project from my front porch."

Stacy said the wind farm could cause property values to tumble anywhere from 20 to 40 percent.

"That's a tremendous impact," Stacy said. "I'm looking at this two ways. Number one I'm a citizen who will be impacted by the viewshed. Number two, I'm a personal injury lawyer. If all of the information out there is accurate, wind turbines have never been put this close to personal property."

Stacy said wind farms could adversely impact the health of those who live in close proximity to the turbines.

"The formal name they have given to it is wind turbine syndrome," Stacy said. "There are two problems. One is the lack of sleep because of the noise factor. The doctors say it is pretty much due to sleep deprivation. People with migraines and attention deficit disorders seem to be more affected by it than others. And obviously with Springville Elementary School there at the base of the mountain, we are very concerned, and we are hoping the county will be concerned that there is a health factor."

The view of East River Mountain also will be forever changed for Kevin Scott, who lives in Springville.

"Yes sir, every time I step out my back door that is what I would see," Scott said of the proposed wind turbines. "And to be honest I've grown up my whole life within view of East River Mountain. Just the thought of having to see those things everyday - it makes me kind of ill thinking about it. I hate the thought of losing the mountaintop."

Scott said the current view of East River Mountain is "serene and peaceful."

"It (the wind turbines) would be a very big change," Scott said. "It's something I'm not ready for."

"We are just deeply concerned for our area," Lloyd Evans, another property owner in Bluefield, Va., said. "We have to sit here and watch these things turn."

Evans said the wind turbines will have ecological, environmental and aesthetic impacts on property owners."

Evans said Dominion and BP are targeting East River Mountain because Tazewell County has no current zoning ordinance in place.

"What they are planing to do is put these things within the view of 30,000 residences and homes all along the 19-460 corridor," Wayne Evans, also of Bluefield, Va., said. "People have to listen and look at these things all day long. To trade the value of our mountains, which is our calling card - if you look at the businesses around here - they all use the mountain logo. West Virginia is the Mountain State. I can't think of no other way to ruin that. It's a no win situation."

Energy companies are developing wind turbines because of the new federal tax credits, Wayne Evans said.

"It's really in a nutshell dependent upon cap and trade, which is still before the Congress, and also the federal tax subsidies that are attributed to this and really make this possible," he said.

Members of the Mountain Preservation Association, a local citizens group opposed to the wind turbines, are urging area to attend a public hearing on the county's proposed ridgeline protection ordinance scheduled for Tuesday, Jan. 12, at 6:15 p.m. at Tazewell Middle School.

Dominion and BP Wind Energy North America have proposed the development of as many as 60, 400-foot tall windmills along East River Mountain near Bluefield, Va. However, the recently released Springsted study based its projections on the construction of 30 to 40 wind turbines on East River Mountain

Dominion continues to acquire wind data on a real-time basis on East River Mountain, and recently erected a second meteorological tower at the site, according to earlier reports by the company.

The Springsted economic impact study concluded the $200 million project will create 150 temporary construction jobs during the construction phase and $10 million in new revenue from local products and services.

According to the report, the primary benefits of the wind turbines will come in the form of property tax receipts through taxes collected from the wind turbine farms and their equipment. However, the report also concludes that the revenue - while significant in the early years of the project - will steadily decrease as the assets depreciate.


Source: http://www.bdtonline.com/lo...

NOV 29 2009
http://www.windaction.org/posts/23344-opposing-view
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