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Geese will not be fans of giant turbine plans

Residents of a Lancashire village have expressed anger after plans to build two huge wind turbines were recommended for approval by planners. ...residents fear the devices will decimate the area's population of pink-footed geese, destroy the landscape and affect people's health because of noise and the 'shadow flicker' caused by the blades. Residents sent 632 letters of objection and Pilling Parish Council, Garstang Town Council and the RSPB also objected.

Residents of a Lancashire village have expressed anger after plans to build two huge wind turbines were recommended for approval by planners.

Cornwall-based CLP Wind Projects is behind plans for two 80-metre turbines at Orchard End Farm, Eagland Hill, Pilling, which have prompted a wave of objections.

It is the second time the application has been submitted, after Wyre Council's planning committee threw it out last May.

The applicants say the devices, which would stand 125m at the tip of the turbine blades, will provide power for 2,000 local homes and could prevent up to 8,400 tonnes of CO2 emissions every year.

But residents fear the devices will decimate the area's population of pink-footed geese, destroy the landscape and affect people's health because of noise and the 'shadow flicker' caused by the blades.

Residents sent 632 letters of objection and Pilling Parish Council, Garstang Town Council and the RSPB also objected.

A statement from Pilling Parish Council said the "size, height and location" of the turbines meant there would be "substantial injury" to the appearance of the area.

Developers say the site at Eagland Hill was chosen because it benefits from "optimum wind levels".... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Residents of a Lancashire village have expressed anger after plans to build two huge wind turbines were recommended for approval by planners.

Cornwall-based CLP Wind Projects is behind plans for two 80-metre turbines at Orchard End Farm, Eagland Hill, Pilling, which have prompted a wave of objections.

It is the second time the application has been submitted, after Wyre Council's planning committee threw it out last May.

The applicants say the devices, which would stand 125m at the tip of the turbine blades, will provide power for 2,000 local homes and could prevent up to 8,400 tonnes of CO2 emissions every year.

But residents fear the devices will decimate the area's population of pink-footed geese, destroy the landscape and affect people's health because of noise and the 'shadow flicker' caused by the blades.

Residents sent 632 letters of objection and Pilling Parish Council, Garstang Town Council and the RSPB also objected.

A statement from Pilling Parish Council said the "size, height and location" of the turbines meant there would be "substantial injury" to the appearance of the area.

Developers say the site at Eagland Hill was chosen because it benefits from "optimum wind levels".

A report by planning officers for committee members says: "It is acknowledged this is a flat open area in the countryside but these are also the best sites for this type of development.

"A balance has to be struck between visual impact and optimum wind generation."

A study by CLP identified nine properties which could be affected by shadow flicker and the times they could be affected.

The turbines can be programmed to cease operation at these times, the report adds.

However, it is estimated the pink footed geese population could be affected by the turbines, with up to 55 of the birds colliding with the devices every year.

Natural England and Lancashire County Council however say that the applicant can mitigate this with new feeding grounds and negotiations are ongoing.

The officers' report adds: "The council consider that the application meets national, regional and local policies."

The plans will be considered by Wyre Council on Wednesday, December 2.


Source: http://www.lep.co.uk/news/G...

NOV 26 2009
http://www.windaction.org/posts/23289-geese-will-not-be-fans-of-giant-turbine-plans
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