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Estes Park looks at possible wind turbine rules

Despite the push towards cleaner energy, one Colorado town is putting a hold on wind turbines used to generate electricity. Concerns over how the turbines look in Estes Park have prompted the town to put a temporary halt to any new electricity-generating windmills.

Despite the push towards cleaner energy, one Colorado town is putting a hold on wind turbines used to generate electricity.

Concerns over how the turbines look in Estes Park have prompted the town to put a temporary halt to any new electricity-generating windmills.

So far two wind turbines have been built in Estes Park and permits have been issued for another three. There's concern that the homeowner-installed turbines which turn wind into electricity could also ruin the mountain views there.

"One of the things people do like about living in Estes Park are the views. We've got 21 mountain peaks, the trees, and when a wind turbine came up it seemed to draw attention from some of our local residents," said Lowell Richardson, Deputy Town Administrator.

Richardson says a new 4-month moratorium on turbine permits will give Estes Park time to study what, if any, restrictions should be added to the town's 30-foot height limit, so the green energy source isn't an eyesore.

"There's a dichotomy there because the town of Estes Park is very much eco-friendly and we're trying to encourage the use of alternative energy resources," Richardson said.

One of the turbines is just up the hill from Herald... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Despite the push towards cleaner energy, one Colorado town is putting a hold on wind turbines used to generate electricity.

Concerns over how the turbines look in Estes Park have prompted the town to put a temporary halt to any new electricity-generating windmills.

So far two wind turbines have been built in Estes Park and permits have been issued for another three. There's concern that the homeowner-installed turbines which turn wind into electricity could also ruin the mountain views there.

"One of the things people do like about living in Estes Park are the views. We've got 21 mountain peaks, the trees, and when a wind turbine came up it seemed to draw attention from some of our local residents," said Lowell Richardson, Deputy Town Administrator.

Richardson says a new 4-month moratorium on turbine permits will give Estes Park time to study what, if any, restrictions should be added to the town's 30-foot height limit, so the green energy source isn't an eyesore.

"There's a dichotomy there because the town of Estes Park is very much eco-friendly and we're trying to encourage the use of alternative energy resources," Richardson said.

One of the turbines is just up the hill from Herald Churchill's home.

"I don't have a problem with it," Churchill said. "If he can get good out of it, hooray for him."

Estes Park administrators hope to hear from the public on what concerns they have over the wind turbines and their mountain views.


Source: http://cbs4denver.com/local...

AUG 22 2009
http://www.windaction.org/posts/21856-estes-park-looks-at-possible-wind-turbine-rules
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