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Western opposition to coal plants could land them in Wyoming

GILLETTE -- Wyoming energy officials hope that recent action by the Idaho Legislature to place a two-year moratorium on new construction of coal-burning power plants will work in Wyoming's favor.

Faced with growing opposition rooted in health and environmental concerns, Sempra Generation announced this week it plans to abandon a proposed $1 billion, 600-megawatt coal-fired power plant in Idaho and a $2 billion, 1,200-megawatt coal-fired power plant in Nevada.

Moving in the other direction, Wyoming recently passed legislation expanding the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority's $1 billion bonding capability to include coal-based power generation, including proven -- but not yet commercialized -- clean-coal technologies.

Steve Waddington, executive director of the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority, said his organization wants Wyoming to host the next generation of electrical power sources. That will likely include a mix of pulverized coal, clean-coal technology and wind resources.

"If Idaho doesn't want coal-fired generation in Idaho, they better understand the need to add transmission, because the power will either be met locally or there will be a need for transmission. That might be good for Wyoming at the end of the day," Waddington said.

Wyoming's legislation loosely identifies "advanced" coal technologies, which Waddington said could possibly... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  
Faced with growing opposition rooted in health and environmental concerns, Sempra Generation announced this week it plans to abandon a proposed $1 billion, 600-megawatt coal-fired power plant in Idaho and a $2 billion, 1,200-megawatt coal-fired power plant in Nevada.

Moving in the other direction, Wyoming recently passed legislation expanding the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority's $1 billion bonding capability to include coal-based power generation, including proven -- but not yet commercialized -- clean-coal technologies.

Steve Waddington, executive director of the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority, said his organization wants Wyoming to host the next generation of electrical power sources. That will likely include a mix of pulverized coal, clean-coal technology and wind resources.

"If Idaho doesn't want coal-fired generation in Idaho, they better understand the need to add transmission, because the power will either be met locally or there will be a need for transmission. That might be good for Wyoming at the end of the day," Waddington said.

Wyoming's legislation loosely identifies "advanced" coal technologies, which Waddington said could possibly include new pulverized coal designs currently on the drawing board throughout the West and in Wyoming. However, he said, the intent is to focus on those coal technologies -- principally, integrated gasification combined cycle -- that are not yet in commercial use here.

IGCC is a process in which coal is converted into a cleaner-burning synthetic gas or liquid while generating electricity and providing an opportunity to sequester carbon dioxide.

Mounting demand for energy throughout the West will also dictate that wind power and other renewable resources be a part of the mix, Waddington said.

"Areas all along the West Coast are going to demand (electrical) generation from the new, cleaner technology, and I think we will meet that demand. We'll see the day come," Waddington said.

Energy reporter Dustin Bleizeffer can be reached at (307) 682-3388 or dustin.bleizeffer@casperstartribune.net.


Source: http://www.jacksonholestart...

APR 3 2006
http://www.windaction.org/posts/2013-western-opposition-to-coal-plants-could-land-them-in-wyoming
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