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Perrysburg adopts wind turbine rules

The city is getting greener, at least in terms of electric utility generation. Perrysburg recently adopted standards for wind turbine electric generators as part of a number of changes to the city's planning and zoning code. Wind turbines up to 100-feet tall are permitted in certain areas of the city.

PERRYSBURG - The city is getting greener, at least in terms of electric utility generation.

Perrysburg recently adopted standards for wind turbine electric generators as part of a number of changes to the city's planning and zoning code. Wind turbines up to 100-feet tall are permitted in certain areas of the city.

The action comes after Perrysburg officials received several inquiries from residents interested in the rules and regulations governing wind turbine installation.

According to Rick Thielen, the city's planning, zoning and economic development director, a half dozen residents have asked about locating wind turbines in residential subdivisions including The Sanctuary, on the south end near River Road (Ohio 65), and also on the north end in Three Meadows subdivision.

Prior to amending the zoning code's Special Approval Use section to allow for wind turbines, the city considered them an Accessory Use under the zoning code. Wind turbines essentially were prohibited under Accessory Use, typically used for garages and other home additions, because it limited height of such accessory structures to 25 feet, too low for even small residential wind turbines.... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

PERRYSBURG - The city is getting greener, at least in terms of electric utility generation.

Perrysburg recently adopted standards for wind turbine electric generators as part of a number of changes to the city's planning and zoning code. Wind turbines up to 100-feet tall are permitted in certain areas of the city.

The action comes after Perrysburg officials received several inquiries from residents interested in the rules and regulations governing wind turbine installation.

According to Rick Thielen, the city's planning, zoning and economic development director, a half dozen residents have asked about locating wind turbines in residential subdivisions including The Sanctuary, on the south end near River Road (Ohio 65), and also on the north end in Three Meadows subdivision.

Prior to amending the zoning code's Special Approval Use section to allow for wind turbines, the city considered them an Accessory Use under the zoning code. Wind turbines essentially were prohibited under Accessory Use, typically used for garages and other home additions, because it limited height of such accessory structures to 25 feet, too low for even small residential wind turbines.

The new Special Approval Use for wind turbines increases the height to accommodate small turbines and also sets safety standards.

"We've had a number of inquiries and decided we should probably come up with some criteria," Thielen explained.

The wind turbines will be permitted only in residential areas zoned R1, those with lots 30,000 square-feet or larger, and also land zoned for agricultural or industrial use. In some limited cases, a landowner who meets the city's standards for "fall zones" and other requirements, but is not in an R1, agricultural or industrial zoned area, can apply for a zoning variance through the city's Board of Zoning Appeals.

Thielen said wind turbines likely won't be permitted in the more densely populated R2 or R3 residential areas unless the property owner is able to secure several parcels equaling or exceeding 30,000 square feet. For example, he said it's unlikely wind turbines will be permitted in a more densely populated area like Three Meadows. However, the larger lots of some other residential neighborhoods, particularly on the south end, may be suitable for small wind turbines.

So far, there have been inquiries but no applications to erect wind turbines in the city.

Under the amended zoning code, anyone interested in setting up a wind turbine in Perrysburg must first receive a zoning permit before construction or installation begins. Applicants must provide an engineer's report including information on the total size and height of the turbine, the size and depth of its concrete base, an average decibel or noise rating for the particular model, a description of all safety measures, and data on kilowatt and generating capacity.

Applicants also must provide the city with information on the location of all public and private airports in relation to the turbine's proposed location, and any Federal Aviation Administration restrictions that may apply.

Under the recently adopted standards, the maximum height of any wind turbine is set at 100-feet measured from the base up to the maximum height of the turbine's blades.

Any wind turbine installation must include a "clear fall zone" from all neighboring property lines and structures. A turbine must be placed in such a position that if it were to fall in any direction it would be contained to the owner's property.

Turbines erected in the city must be painted or color coated with either white, gray or sky blue. Logos or other markings on the turbine are limited to those of the manufacturer or model type. Other logos are not permitted.

Turbines must be maintained. Any turbine inoperable for more than six months must be removed by the owner within 30 days.

Wood County already is home to four very large wind turbines, located west of Bowling Green near the Wood County Landfill. Officially known as the Omega JV6 project, the turbines are more than 300 feet tall, part of a joint effort of 10 member communities of American Municipal Power Ohio and Green Mountain Energy.

Perrysburg's recent code amendment addresses the possibility of smaller turbines being erected for individual commercial or residential use. Local companies like Green By Design, located at 19551 N. Dixie Highway (Ohio 25) near Bowling Green, are selling much smaller turbines, under 100 feet tall, for home or small businesses. One of those turbines is located in front of the business on the west side of Route 25.

Courts have ruled that local zoning cannot interfere with large scale wind farms because they're considered public utilities. However, communities can set rules for turbines at individual residences or businesses.


Source: http://www.sent-trib.com/in...

APR 6 2009
http://www.windaction.org/posts/19738-perrysburg-adopts-wind-turbine-rules
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