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State sets turbine deadline; Wind power group commits to plans

The developers of an industrial wind farm near Frostburg must start construction within three years and must have at least one working turbine within five years. Those details, and other relatively minor conditions, were released today as the Maryland Public Service Commission issued its formal report on the Dan's Mountain Wind Force project. The commission considered whether to grant the company an exemption from the full regulatory review process during its meeting Wednesday in Baltimore.

CUMBERLAND - The developers of an industrial wind farm near Frostburg must start construction within three years and must have at least one working turbine within five years.

Those details, and other relatively minor conditions, were released today as the Maryland Public Service Commission issued its formal report on the Dan's Mountain Wind Force project. The commission considered whether to grant the company an exemption from the full regulatory review process during its meeting Wednesday in Baltimore.

Dan's Mountain Wind Force also must allow access to the facility to state agencies with proper notice.

"Additionally, staff noted that the applicant agreed to provide an annual report of its progress in constructing any turbines," wrote Terry Romine, executive secretary of the commission, to an attorney for the wind developer.

The company volunteered to follow the recommendation of the Power Plant Research Project of the state Department of Natural Resources, which suggested Dan's Mountain Wind Force conduct bat and bird monitoring after construction of up to 29 wind turbines on 3,000 acres adjacent to Dan's Rock.

Romine noted the exemption "does not limit the authority of any state or local... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

CUMBERLAND - The developers of an industrial wind farm near Frostburg must start construction within three years and must have at least one working turbine within five years.

Those details, and other relatively minor conditions, were released today as the Maryland Public Service Commission issued its formal report on the Dan's Mountain Wind Force project. The commission considered whether to grant the company an exemption from the full regulatory review process during its meeting Wednesday in Baltimore.

Dan's Mountain Wind Force also must allow access to the facility to state agencies with proper notice.

"Additionally, staff noted that the applicant agreed to provide an annual report of its progress in constructing any turbines," wrote Terry Romine, executive secretary of the commission, to an attorney for the wind developer.

The company volunteered to follow the recommendation of the Power Plant Research Project of the state Department of Natural Resources, which suggested Dan's Mountain Wind Force conduct bat and bird monitoring after construction of up to 29 wind turbines on 3,000 acres adjacent to Dan's Rock.

Romine noted the exemption "does not limit the authority of any state or local authority and the company must obtain all authorizations or permissions from these authorities applicable to constructing or operating the turbines."

During the meeting Wednesday, Dan's Mountain Wind Force, a subsidiary of Pennsylvania-based U.S. Wind Force LLC, voluntarily committed to resolving all communications interference issues to emergency and education communications carriers, such as TWR Communications and Allegany College of Maryland. The company also has agreed to create an advisory panel and conduct a series of meetings with stakeholders.

The wind energy company also will implement a computer program to measure shadow flicker once the turbines are constructed and agreed to adopt reasonable mitigation measures if shadow flickers become an issue. According to the American Wind Energy Association (www.awea.org), close neighbors of wind farm projects claim a wind turbine's moving blades can cast a moving shadow on a nearby residence. But industry advocates insist the problem is rare in the U.S. because the sun's angle is not very low in the sky. In addition, they say appropriate setbacks for noise are sufficient to prevent shadow flicker problems.

Shadow flicker can result in a momentary reduction of the intensity of natural light. If the regular changes in light intensity levels are high, then the shadow flicker might cause a nuisance, according to the British Department for Business Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Web site www.berr.gov.uk. This generally could impact people who suffer from epilepsy or otherwise have an adverse reaction to flicker effects.


Source: http://www.times-news.com/l...

MAR 13 2009
http://www.windaction.org/posts/19436-state-sets-turbine-deadline-wind-power-group-commits-to-plans
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