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Saving the planet?

Two large utility companies have proposed building more than 150 wind turbines near Searchlight and more than 400 turbines in Lincoln County. These turbines ...would be placed near existing communities, where they would be visible to and affect the lives of all who live near them. Just a few questions for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, who is a strong proponent of these two unpopular projects:

Two large utility companies have proposed building more than 150 wind turbines near Searchlight and more than 400 turbines in Lincoln County. These turbines can exceed 400 feet in height and weigh approximately 163 tons. They would be placed near existing communities, where they would be visible to and affect the lives of all who live near them.

Just a few questions for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, who is a strong proponent of these two unpopular projects:

Why is it OK for large out-of-state energy corporations to build many miles of 18-wheeler-ready roads into untouched areas of the beautiful Mojave Desert and mountain ranges of Clark and Lincoln counties in the name of "green energy," but illegal for John Q. Public to drive down some existing desert trails? (For readers unfamiliar with the construction of a wind farm, each turbine must have a road wide enough and strong enough to carry 18-wheel tractor-trailers to each and every turbine.)

Why is it OK to disrupt the beautiful views and sunsets of the Mojave Desert and mountain ranges with hundreds of whining generators, placed on federal land near existing historical sites and communities, but not OK to drill oil wells or mine near other public lands?

Why is it OK to push these projects down the throats of local residents while sending the power generated to other states?

Why is it OK to give... [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Two large utility companies have proposed building more than 150 wind turbines near Searchlight and more than 400 turbines in Lincoln County. These turbines can exceed 400 feet in height and weigh approximately 163 tons. They would be placed near existing communities, where they would be visible to and affect the lives of all who live near them.

Just a few questions for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, who is a strong proponent of these two unpopular projects:

Why is it OK for large out-of-state energy corporations to build many miles of 18-wheeler-ready roads into untouched areas of the beautiful Mojave Desert and mountain ranges of Clark and Lincoln counties in the name of "green energy," but illegal for John Q. Public to drive down some existing desert trails? (For readers unfamiliar with the construction of a wind farm, each turbine must have a road wide enough and strong enough to carry 18-wheel tractor-trailers to each and every turbine.)

Why is it OK to disrupt the beautiful views and sunsets of the Mojave Desert and mountain ranges with hundreds of whining generators, placed on federal land near existing historical sites and communities, but not OK to drill oil wells or mine near other public lands?

Why is it OK to push these projects down the throats of local residents while sending the power generated to other states?

Why is it OK to give "green" energy producers (large East Coast or West Coast corporations) the proposed eight years of tax breaks in one year, while making merely staying in business in Nevada difficult for home-grown, owned and operated Nevada corporations, farms and ranches? There is also much talk of raising taxes on Nevada businesses.

The promised jobs provided by these proposed projects will not go to the people who live in the areas affected. Just like the minimal amount of high-cost power generated, the benefits will accrue to other states and communities. It will also place a huge burden on remote Nevada communities to provide housing and services for the workers during the construction. Where do these services come from, and once they are no longer needed, have we just created instant 21st century ghost towns?

Granted, there will be a temporary upturn in the local economies, where the restaurants, bars, motels, etc., experience short-term benefits. But let us not forget the downside, including higher rates of crime, destruction of the desert and mountain environments in the name of "progress" and "green energy." Must we destroy our environment to "save" it?

The wide-open vistas and open spaces for which Nevada is famous for will be forever despoiled by the unsightly turbines, and when they break down they are typically abandoned in place. Are there any requirements for the energy companies to restore the areas to their original condition? Or will future generations gaze upon the devastation and hulking, dead turbines and say: "What on earth were they thinking?"


Source: link missing! please notify us

JAN 18 2009
http://www.windaction.org/posts/18651-saving-the-planet
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