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Printer goes green for profit, pride

Companies attempt to stand out from the competition based on three factors -- quality, speed and price, Stanton said. "We give you a fourth one." ...The company was one of the first businesses in New Jersey to commit to purchasing energy from the new wind farm in Atlantic City.

RIDGEFIELD PARK -- The electricity running his printing presses is generated by the wind. Most jobs use environmentally friendly paper and ink only. Computers control heat and air conditioning to provide optimal energy efficiency in the plant.

Arthur Stanton obviously doesn't need to be sold on the benefits of going green. In fact, his customers are demanding it. Merely using recycled paper is no longer enough.

For companies like Stanton's Globe Lithographing Co. in Ridgefield Park, environmental stewardship has become a way of life. Doing so might entail higher up-front costs versus traditional products and services, but the investment can be worth it.

"It's two for one," Stanton said. "You can be environmentally conscious and can enhance your bottom line. It is a tool to bring in new business. We're here to make money, but if we can afford it, we'll do it in environmentally sound ways."

Potential clients are increasingly demanding work that is certified "green" by various environmental organizations, such as the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), which verifies that paper comes from what it calls responsibly... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

RIDGEFIELD PARK -- The electricity running his printing presses is generated by the wind. Most jobs use environmentally friendly paper and ink only. Computers control heat and air conditioning to provide optimal energy efficiency in the plant.

Arthur Stanton obviously doesn't need to be sold on the benefits of going green. In fact, his customers are demanding it. Merely using recycled paper is no longer enough.

For companies like Stanton's Globe Lithographing Co. in Ridgefield Park, environmental stewardship has become a way of life. Doing so might entail higher up-front costs versus traditional products and services, but the investment can be worth it.

"It's two for one," Stanton said. "You can be environmentally conscious and can enhance your bottom line. It is a tool to bring in new business. We're here to make money, but if we can afford it, we'll do it in environmentally sound ways."

Potential clients are increasingly demanding work that is certified "green" by various environmental organizations, such as the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), which verifies that paper comes from what it calls responsibly harvested sources.

Being able to produce work with a "certified" label is a selling point now, but it's eventually going to become a mandate, Stanton predicted.

Rather than wait, the company made two major moves this year, installing a $2 million Heidelberg Speedmaster printer that is 35 percent more efficient than its old press and signing a contract to purchase 100 percent of its electricity -- more than 1 million kilowatts this year -- from a Pennsylvania wind farm.

Wind power will cost the company about 15 percent more. That adds up quickly when your electric bill averages nearly $12,000 a month.

The company also is exploring the possibility of installing its own wind turbines or solar panels on the roof of its 55,000-square- foot plant at the end of Teaneck Road.

Globe's environmental initiatives are overseen by Robert Lion, a vice president who carries the additional title of "chief sustainability officer."

Under Lion's leadership, Globe was certified by the FSC last October, by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as an EPA Green Power Partner in June and by The Center for Resource Solutions (CRS) in July. The EPA and CRS certificates are based on Globe having its electricity from renewable sources, and they allow the company to use the EPA and "Green-e" logos on print jobs.

Companies attempt to stand out from the competition based on three factors -- quality, speed and price, Stanton said. "We give you a fourth one."

Educating customers to the impact their decisions can make is a key part of his mission, Stanton said. For example, by switching from virgin stock to paper that is 30 percent from recycled sources on a 500-ton printing job can save 2,520 trees, 1.1 million gallons of wastewater and 1.8 billion BTUs of energy, according to an environmental calculator developed by the Mohawk Paper Co.

Those numbers are real -- something customers can appreciate, he said.

Globe is part of a growing movement to invest in environmentally friendly printing. A recent survey by Graphic Arts Monthly, a trade publication, identified Globe as among 181 printing facilities, 25 paper manufacturers and 48 merchant locations in the U.S. that have earned FSC certification.

That is more than double the number of FSC-certified printers identified last fall. Included were Sandy Alexander of Clifton, Pictorial Offset Corp. and Unimac Graphics of Carlstadt, and Pace Press Inc. of Moonachie.

Sandy Alexander, which was recognized as "Power Purchaser of the Year" for 2006 by the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities, invested more than $100,000 to convert to 100 percent wind power and more than $500,000 on other eco-friendly upgrades.

The company was one of the first businesses in New Jersey to commit to purchasing energy from the new wind farm in Atlantic City.

Pictorial Offset, one of the nation's largest printers, has been certified for both product quality and environmental standards by the Geneva-based International Organization for Standardiza- tion after finding long-term methods for reducing and recycling waste.

Both companies reported to Graphic Arts that their green initiatives were also moneymakers. Sandy Alexander said it gained $2 million to $3 million in business as a result, while Pictorial Offset reported picking up more than $1 million in new business due to its commitment. It also saved $500,000 annually through its recycling program.

Globe has been in business for 41 years. It began operations in Wallington, but moved to Ridgefield Park seven years ago after suffering heavy damage from Hurricane Floyd. With annual sales of about $7 million, it does most of its work for financial services companies, including Citi Corp. and Merrill Lynch, and the pharmaceutical industry.

E-mail: demarrais@northjersey.com


Source: http://www.northjersey.com/...

OCT 9 2007
http://www.windaction.org/posts/11365-printer-goes-green-for-profit-pride
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