Library filed under Impact on Birds from USA

Solar farms threaten birds

The effects of wind turbines on birds, which research suggests kill far fewer birds per megawatt hour than do fossil fuel plants, have long been a source of consternation for many environmentalists. Their bird-killing effects have been serious enough to kill and hamper some planned projects. Now, as concentrated solar farms start to sweep the globe, solar energy developers are facing similar outcries and opposition for the harm that their clean energy facilities can cause to wildlife.
27 Aug 2014

Eagle Take Permits for wind farms - Will they fly?

Even after issuance of the first eagle take permit, the likelihood of obtaining an eagle take permit and a project’s liability for adversely impacting eagles without a permit remains in uncharted territory until more permits are issued. Given the pending NEPA review and legal challenge with respect to the 30-year term, it is unclear at this point how the eagle permitting process may evolve.
21 Aug 2014

Tule Wind Eagle Permit Rejection

Usfws_tule_eaglepermitreject_8-1-14_thumb The US Fish and Wildlife Service denied Iberdrola's request for an eagle take permit. The rejection letter is provided below and can be accessed by clicking the link on this page. Iberdrola's application was one of the first to seek a 30-year term on the permit. In addition to the FWS letter, you can also view Iberdrola's cover letter submitted with its permit application where the company cites its interest in a long-term permit. 
1 Aug 2014

Tule Wind Eagle Permit Rejection

Usfws_tule_eaglepermitreject_8-1-14_thumb The US Fish and Wildlife Service denied Iberdrola's request for an eagle take permit. The rejection letter is provided below and can be accessed by clicking the link on this page. Iberdrola's application was one of the first to seek a 30-year term on the permit. In addition to the FWS letter, you can also view Iberdrola's cover letter submitted with its permit application where the company cites its interest in a long-term permit. 
1 Aug 2014

Wind energy companies seek balance between production, protection

Hutchins believes seasonal shutdowns or retrofitting power lines and towers are useful tools for reducing bird deaths once wind farms are up and running. The best strategy, though, is siting the turbines properly in the first place. “Unfortunately, these things are going up anywhere, including in important bird areas, and we think that’s highly problematic,” Hutchins said.
26 Jul 2014

Conservationists, wind-farm advocates clash over eagle safety

Environmentalist groups don’t just oppose the 30-year permits — they want the entire permitting process overhauled. He said that the permits should be mandatory, not voluntary, and that wind companies should be required to report publicly all eagle mortalities. Wind industry advocates argue that the 30-year permit provides more stability for investors who supply the essential upfront capital.
25 Jul 2014

Critics of wind power blame feds for killing, ‘chopping up’ eagles, other birds

“Eagles along with other birds are being chopped out of the air and suffer horrible injuries and death by the blades of high-speed wind turbines,” wrote Patricia Lewko. “This practice has been given a green light by this administration in the name the name of Clean or Green Energy … What is so clean about chopping up birds to either lie in agony or be mutilated?”
21 Jul 2014

Bald eagles thrive while goldens face rising threats around West

Meanwhile, whirling turbine blades and electrical lines running to oil and gas facilities and wind farms have been linked to golden eagle deaths. Nobody has a good handle on how many eagles and other raptors are caught in blades or electrocuted; scientists have calculated in peer-reviewed articles that turbines kill at least 60 to 65 golden eagles a year nationwide.
6 Jul 2014

Bald eagles thrive while goldens face rising threats around West

Meanwhile, whirling turbine blades and electrical lines running to oil and gas facilities and wind farms have been linked to golden eagle deaths. Nobody has a good handle on how many eagles and other raptors are caught in blades or electrocuted; scientists have calculated in peer-reviewed articles that turbines kill at least 60 to 65 golden eagles a year nationwide.
6 Jul 2014

Refining estimates of bird collision and electrocution mortality at power lines in the United States

Journal.pone.0101565_thumb Collisions and electrocutions at power lines are thought to kill large numbers of birds in the United States annually. However, existing estimates of mortality are either speculative (for electrocution) or based on extrapolation of results from one study to all U.S. power lines (for collision). This paper attempts to quantify bird mortality. The abstract is posted below. The full paper can be accessed at the links on this page.
3 Jul 2014

Eagles killed by Palm Springs windmills raise concerns

The permitting system relies on wind energy companies and other parties to be forthcoming about how many dead birds they find on their property. Critics say that system effectively can encourage companies to infrequently monitor and look the other way. "My question is why should anybody tell the government that they're killing federally protected birds?" Hutchins said in a telephone interview from Washington.
3 Jul 2014

Eagles killed by Palm Springs windmills raise concerns

The permitting system relies on wind energy companies and other parties to be forthcoming about how many dead birds they find on their property. Critics say that system effectively can encourage companies to infrequently monitor and look the other way. "My question is why should anybody tell the government that they're killing federally protected birds?" Hutchins said in a telephone interview from Washington.
3 Jul 2014

https://www.windaction.org/posts?location=USA&p=15&topic=Impact+on+Birds
back to top