Library filed under Impact on Wildlife from UK

Underwater power cables are 'mesmerising' brown crabs and causing biological changes that could affect their migration habits, scientists warn

Experts in Scotland found exposure to electromagnetism triggered 'behavioural and physiological responses' in around 60 brown crabs at the St Abbs Marine Station. ...The cables for offshore renewable energy also emit an electromagnetic field that attracts the crabs and causes them to become stationary, which affects breeding and migration, according to the team. 
11 Oct 2021

Ocean life is at risk from turbines: Ramping up wind power off British coast will cause loss of marine life by 'urbanising the sea', experts warn

Melanie Austen, Professor of Ocean and Society at Plymouth University, said: ‘We’re talking about effectively urbanising the sea by introducing these structures. Introducing hard structure through cables and the turbines themselves is going to change the ecology and the ecosystem.’
21 Mar 2021

Protect marine life from WWII bomb detonations on wind farm sites, urges Joanna Lumley

Ms Lumley and marine conservation groups fear that more whales and dolphins could be harmed after Boris Johnson promised to ramp up the UK’s offshore wind capacity and are calling for less harmful methods to be used. There is limited data on the impact of exploding ordnance in the sea, but a 2015 study on one area of the North Sea suggested 88 explosions had “very likely” caused permanent hearing loss in 1,280 Harbour Porpoises. 
3 Nov 2020

Energy: Campaigners 'would fight' more turbines off Wales coast

"We'll be absolutely there on the front line to attack it, because we believe what we've got now is more than we should have to bear... We've got the Snowdonia National Park and looking out from that you'll see this forest of metal turbines. It's just diabolical," he said. "Scenery is all part of what we sell as a tourist destination and tourism is our only industry. To put those there is industrialising the seascape.
26 Sep 2019

RSPB comments re: Hornsea Three Development Consent Order

En010080-003105-the_royal_society_for_the_protection_of_birds_post-examination_submission_thumb The attached letter written by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds raises their concerns over Hornsea Project Three, an offshore wind project located in the North Sea. New information has arisen indicating that the project will adversely effect the breeding grounds of the gannet, kittiwake, and black-backed gull populations and negatively impact the integrity of the Flamborough and Filey Coast SPA. The Royal Society urges the Secretary of State to extend the deadline for the project's development order to consider this new information and recommends that alternative energy solutions be explored.
6 Sep 2019

The green energy debate: are wind farms really worth it?

A partnership between Scottish and Southern Energy and the council-owned Viking Energy Shetland, signed in 2005, the windfarm is to largely be built on peatlands, raising fears over carbon release. ...While peatlands cover only 3% of the world's land area they contain nearly 30% of all carbon stored on land. Campaigners and experts warn that damage to the peatlands could be irreversible with degraded peat losing the ability to absorb carbon and potentially releasing thousands of tonnes back into the atmosphere.
25 Aug 2019

Wind farms are the 'new apex predators': Blades kill off 75% of buzzards, hawks and kites that live nearby, study shows

Study coauthor Professor Maria Thaker said: 'We have known from many studies that wind farms affect birds and bats. 'They kill them and disrupt their movement. But we took that one step further and discovered that it affects lizards too. 'Every time a top predator is removed or added, unexpected effects trickle through the ecosystem.
5 Nov 2018

Study reveals that wind farm led to reduction in number of breeding birds

The study, due to be published in Ibis, reports that numbers of the plover, which are protected under the European Birds Directive, dropped by 80 per cent within the wind farm during the first two years of operation, with these declines being markedly greater than on areas surrounding the wind farm that were studied over the same period.
15 Apr 2016

https://www.windaction.org/posts?location=UK&topic=Impact+on+Wildlife
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