Library filed under Zoning/Planning from UK

Whinash Decision Documents

Whinashwindfarm_thumb The Secretary of State accepts the Inspector’s [David M H Rose] findings on the section 36 application. He agrees with the Inspector’s conclusions that the Whinash site is an important and integral part of a far reaching landscape which is highly sensitive to change and that the adverse environmental impacts of the Development would conflict with the aims of Planning Policy Statement 22 which is, in part, to minimise the impacts of wind generation and to achieve environmental safeguards. He also agrees with the Inspector’s conclusion that the environmental harm to this particular landscape outweighs the benefits of securing renewable energy at the Whinash site. The Secretary of State therefore accepts, taking account of the further comments below, the Inspector’s recommendation that consent be refused. Editor's Note: The pdf file contains the complete report.
2 Mar 2006

UK Energy Policy: The Small Business Perspective & The Impact on the Rural Economy

Sbcenergyreport_thumb This report surveys the intense debate now taking place as to why the chosen strategy is not achieving its objectives. We believe that a principal factor is to be found in the increasingly controversial renewable energy policy, which is widely criticised for its lack of balance and its over-emphasis on onshore wind at the expense of other technologies.
1 Feb 2006

Boost for wind turbines opponents

Campaigners against a proposed windfarm in north Devon are claiming a small victory in preventing the turbines. A report by Devon County Council's environment director says the impact on the environment far outweighs the renewable energy benefits.
25 Jan 2006

It's an ill wind

What a high price to pay for a technology whose benefits remain in so much doubt. Editor's Note: Please refer to 'Blow for wind farm protesters' 1/21/06 available in NWW's news section.
23 Jan 2006

Wind-farm company in land purchase row

"In the legal and planning tradition of this country, powers of compulsory purchase are rarely granted, and this growing precedent for automatic award of such powers to enable businesses to further their commercial ends is deeply disturbing."[Campbell Dunford, chief executive, Renewable Energy Foundation]
6 Jan 2006

https://www.windaction.org/posts?location=UK&p=81&topic=Zoning%2FPlanning
back to top