Articles filed under Energy Policy from South Carolina

Jeter lays out energy plan; Candidate's ideas include nuclear, wind, solar power as alternatives

The United States faces an energy crisis and must fight it in multiple ways -- conservation, additional U.S. drilling, clean coal, building nuclear energy plants and using alternative energy when available, said Charles Jeter, a candidate for the Fourth District seat in Congress. ...Jeter said the country needs to explore all alternative resources that make sense -- wind for one, he said. However, it currently provides only 1 percent of the U.S. energy mix and he doesn't expect it to ever provide more than 3 percent to 5 percent.
5 Jun 2008

Common sense needed on energy security

Not since President Jimmy Carter had solar panels installed at the White House has there been as much hype for renewable energy sources as there is now. Congress once again is pushing for passage of legislation mandating a "renewable portfolio." South Carolina is wisely letting the free market determine whether renewables will catch on. But 25 states have adopted renewable energy requirements, committing nearly half of our country's population to obtaining as much as 25 percent of their electricity from solar, wind and other "green" sources by 2020. Increasing our use of renewable energy is a worthwhile goal. But if we allow the heavy hand of government to mandate its use, we're setting solar and wind energy up to fail. ...Wind power has appeal not because it's clean, but because tax breaks and subsidies for wind are now so valuable for wind-farm owners.
7 May 2008

Wind, solar a waste of valuable tax dollars

Not since President Jimmy Carter had solar panels installed at the White House has there been as much hype for renewable energy sources as we are witnessing now. Congressional leaders once again are pushing for passage of legislation that would mandate a "renewable portfolio." South Carolina is wisely letting the free market determine whether or not renewables will catch on. But 25 states have adopted renewable energy requirements, committing nearly half of our country's population to obtaining as much as 25 percent of their electricity from solar, wind and other "green " sources by 2020. ...Wind power has appeal, but not because it's non-polluting. Tax breaks and subsidies for wind are now so large that their value to wind farm owners - not any possible environmental benefits - is the primary motivation for building a wind farm. Over the past decade, large-scale wind farms have been built in Texas, California, Kansas, Wyoming and other states. But at best, the wind blows only 40 percent of the time. Wind is so unpredictable that electricity shortages have hobbled businesses and industries in both Texas and California, the two states with the most wind energy capacity, mainly because the wind stopped blowing and wind turbines were operating at only 5 percent of capacity.
12 Apr 2008

https://www.windaction.org/posts?location=South+Carolina&p=4&topic=Energy+Policy&type=Article
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