Articles filed under Energy Policy from Europe

Why the £250bn wind power industry could be the greatest scam of our age - and here are the three 'lies' that prove it

So riddled with environmental hypocrisy is the lobbying for wind energy that a recent newspaper report exposed the immense human and ecological catastrophe being inflicted on northern China by the extraction of the rare earth minerals needed to make the giant magnets that every turbine in the West uses to generate its power. Here in a nutshell are some of the reasons why people are beginning to wake up to the horrific downside of the wind business.
28 Feb 2011

Ireland's big hope or just hot air?

A forthcoming report by the Irish Academy of Engineers (IAE) expresses alarm at the lack of any comprehensive analysis of the costs of the country's current energy policy, while multinationals and other businesses remain deeply concerned about the potential costs of the Government's commitment to generating 40 per cent of our electricity from wind power.
25 Feb 2011

When it comes to windfarms, I don't feel bad about nimbyism

In a paper entitled Windfarms: Time to Change Direction? the Northamptonshire branch of CPRE said the organisation should "re-evaluate" its support for [wind farms] in the light of new evidence suggesting "that the generation of electricity from wind is not an effective way of reducing carbon emissions". There are lots of reasons for believing this, but the main one is probably the fact that there is as yet no economic way of storing electricity.
4 Feb 2011

Austerity pulling plug on Europe's green subsidies

The Spanish and Germans are doing it. So are the French. The British might have to do it. Austerity-whacked Europe is rolling back subsidies for renewable energy as economic sanity makes a tentative comeback. Green energy is becoming unaffordable and may cost as many jobs as it creates. But the real victims are the investors who bought into the dream of endless, clean energy financed by the taxpayer.
26 Jan 2011

Renewables won't keep the lights on

In private, the best-informed analysts now agree that Britain's environmental policies have put the country on track to have the world's most expensive electricity. This is mainly because our competitors are almost certain to choose cheaper routes to emissions reductions, such as natural gas, or to shun emissions reductions altogether.
11 Jan 2011

Renewables won't keep the lights on

In private, the best-informed analysts now agree that Britain's environmental policies have put the country on track to have the world's most expensive electricity. This is mainly because our competitors are almost certain to choose cheaper routes to emissions reductions, such as natural gas, or to shun emissions reductions altogether.
11 Jan 2011

China wind turbines turn as Europe cuts hit

The green agenda is still moving forward, but it is clear that in Europe it has become more challenging because of fiscal constraints," he told the Financial Times. Growth in new wind energy installations in Europe is forecast to shrink from 14 per cent in 2010 to 1 per cent this year, according to analysts at Citigroup. ...Vestas warned that, while 2010 was set to finish stronger than previously expected, revenues and profits were likely to be flat this year.
5 Jan 2011

‘Let them sip latte': Revolt brewing in Spain over ‘green energy' crisis

Last Friday the government cut the subsidy to windmills and solar panels, again. This included cutting solar subsidies retroactively, in one sense, in that those who bought in at astronomical guaranteed returns for 25 years are taking a haircut even though they were locked into the Ponzi pyramid before some pollos starting coming home to roost. Then, this week, the government approved another increase in the price of electricity for households and small business.
31 Dec 2010

'Renewable' energy crisis sinking Spain

Spain's politicians, in something of an emergency move, have just stuck Spanish households and small businesses with a hefty new energy tax to go into effect tomorrow. Yeah, that oughta help matters. This latest in a series of energy tax hikes is intended to help pay down the burst renewabubble, which they also realize they can't just end but must perpetuate.
31 Dec 2010

You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows

Over the past three weeks, with demand for power at record levels because of the freezing weather, there have been days when the contribution of our forests of wind turbines has been precisely nothing. It gets better. As the temperature has plummeted, the turbines have had to be heated to prevent them seizing up. Consequently, they have been consuming more electricity than they generate. Even on a good day they rarely work.
28 Dec 2010

Localism bill promises planning revolution, raises fresh Nimby fears

Arguably the biggest change contained in the bill are new rules allowing for local referendums where people, councillors and councils can instigate a vote on any local issue, including planning proposals. The new referendum powers are likely to present a major challenge to wind farm projects, some of which have faced fierce opposition from local groups.
14 Dec 2010

German opposition backs new cuts for solar power aid

Both the environmentalist Greens and Social Democrats (SPD), who enacted legislation under ex-chancellor Gerhard Schroeder that created the basis for a boom in solar investment, said they were open to paring back assistance the industry receives. "In view of recent developments, a measured reduction in allowances for photovoltaics is definitely possible."
14 Dec 2010

Green collapse

With the market for wind shrinking, Denmark's Vestas, the world's largest wind-turbine company, recently announced it is closing five production facilities in Denmark and Sweden and laying off 3,000 workers ...The coming collapse of the renewables industry - largely a creature of backroom lobbying for government favours by multinationals - is also evident on this side of the ocean.
6 Dec 2010

Germany’s offshore wind: Wasted resources, environmental blight

Europe's energy consumers must pay 20 cents per kWh generated, plus an additional 5 cents per kWh for transmission costs. They must pay this regardless of whether they need the electricity at the moment, and despite the fact that a kWh of wind electricity is worth less than 3 cents on the Leipzig Power Exchange, due to the intermittent and highly variable nature of wind.
1 Dec 2010

https://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Europe&p=28&topic=Energy+Policy&type=Article
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