Library filed under Energy Policy from Europe

Who will pay? Europe’s bold plan on emissions risks political blowback

The social consequences of expanding the ETS means the upcoming reform is already proving to be one of the most sensitive and contested parts of the EU’s radical decarbonisation agenda. Claude Turmes, Luxembourg’s environment minister, says his government will oppose any extension to cover cars and buildings because it “risks penalising lower income parts of the population”. At a summit in Brussels in May, EU leaders from poorer eastern countries also warned that their citizens — many of whom cannot easily afford to ditch their diesel-powered cars or switch heating systems in rented accommodation — will suffer the ill-effects.
31 May 2021

U2 guitarist The Edge backs nuclear power as a solution to climate problem

“We need to think very deeply about whether our current strategy of renewable energy is going to make it. We’ve got to be prepared to rethink certain things. ...The amount of impact on our land in terms of solar photovoltaic cells and windmills, it’s such a huge amount of ground that you have to dedicate to these renewable resources, is it really practical?”
18 Apr 2021

The Germans now pay by far the highest electricity prices in the world

Rather, the new cost driver on consumers' electricity bills is network charges. In the course of the energy transition, network operators have to build reserve power plants and keep them operational, compensate market participants for line bottlenecks and erect thousands of kilometers of extra-high voltage lines. The West German electricity network operator Amprion has just doubled its investment volume for the next ten years to 24 billion euros. "The increased network usage charges and the increase in value added tax have led to this noticeable burden," says Lasse Schmid, Managing Director Energy at Check24: "The minimal reduction in the EEG surcharge cannot compensate for that."
4 Apr 2021

Now the energy transition is becoming a danger for all of Germany

The assumptions of the Ministry of Economic Affairs regarding security of supply for electricity are "partly too optimistic and partly implausible", criticize the auditors. The ministry also did not examine a scenario in which several foreseeable factors coincide that could jeopardize security of supply. So it could be that the network expansion is delayed and at the same time the cross-border transmission capacity is restricted. The Federal Ministry of Economics argues that “a stacking of various disadvantageous scenarios is not sensible according to the state of the technical discussion”. However, the examiners found this objection “not convincing”. Further uncertainties would arise from the increasing demand for electricity for the electrification of transport and for the production of the energy carrier hydrogen in electrolysis plants. The auditors therefore do not share the assumption of the federal government that electricity demand will remain more or less stable until 2030.
31 Mar 2021

The day Europe’s power grid came close to a massive blackout

Large amounts of intermittent electricity create huge swings in supply which the grid has to be able to cope with. The issue isn’t confined to Europe. Australia has had teething problems in the transition to a cleaner network. Wind power was blamed for a blackout in 2016 that cut supply to 850,000 homes. The nation is looking to storage as a solution and was the first country to install a 100 megawatt megabattery in 2017.
27 Jan 2021

The day Europe’s power grid came close to a massive blackout

Large amounts of intermittent electricity create huge swings in supply which the grid has to be able to cope with. The issue isn’t confined to Europe. Australia has had teething problems in the transition to a cleaner network. Wind power was blamed for a blackout in 2016 that cut supply to 850,000 homes. The nation is looking to storage as a solution and was the first country to install a 100 megawatt megabattery in 2017.
27 Jan 2021

Zion Lights, former Extinction Rebellion spokesperson, has doubts about Boris Johnson's plan to make every home wind-powered by 2030

For all the invocations of harnessing our gusty shores in some ‘green revolution’, the proclamations do not stand up to scrutiny. Even if we cranked up wind power provision to the level the Prime Minister proposes (40 gigawatts), this amount would power only about half the homes in Britain - or 7 percent of the total national energy demand.
7 Oct 2020

Boris Johnson’s plan to expand wind power welcomed, but 'funding doesn't match rhetoric'

But he warned: “It won’t be straightforward. The key challenge is to bring down the cost of future floating farms which are a very long distance from the coast – that’s where most of the untapped wind resource is and that is the one technology which is not yet mature enough, so that would need to be accelerated to meet this challenge.
6 Oct 2020

Germany will not receive electricity on the cable to Norway

The Nordlink cable between Norway and Germany is scheduled to be put into trial operation in December, while testing of IT and trading solutions will start as early as September. Both Statnett and the government are therefore working to reach a solution with the German energy authorities. But why will Germany not use a cable that they themselves have helped to build? They want to use the opposite route and export power to Norway when they have negative prices.
31 Aug 2020

“We are heading for a disaster” - Lower Saxony warns of the end of wind power subsidies

Berlin Olaf Lies expects the worst. Lower Saxony's energy and environment minister, together with the consulting firm Windguard, had the experts at his company determine the extent to which wind farms could go offline in the coming years because the subsidies for the systems according to the Renewable Energy Sources Act (EEG) will end. From the point of view of the SPD politician, the results are alarming: "We are heading for a catastrophe," Lies told the Handelsblatt.
22 Aug 2020

Government blocks plans for extension to Vattenfall's Thanet offshore wind farm

The government has refused planning permission to a 340MW extension to Vattenfall's Thanet wind farm off the southeast coast of England, dealing a blow to the company's plans to expand the site's renewable power capacity. Business Secretary Alok Sharma refused consent to the project yesterday, citing concerns about the proposed extension's impact on marine navigation, shipping, and ports in the area.
3 Jun 2020

https://www.windaction.org/posts?location=Europe&p=2&topic=Energy+Policy
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