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DEC may place windmill at Chateaugay Fish Hatchery

CHATEAUGAY -- A 120-foot wind tower may be erected at the State Department of Environmental Conservation Fish Hatchery here to generate electricity to power the operation.

An alternative-energy windmill demonstration project is being proposed by DEC's Division of Operations and the Division of Fish, Wildlife and Marine Resources to begin in the spring.

10,000 WATTS A YEAR

The plan calls for the installation of a 10-kilowatt turbine on top of a 120-foot lattice-type tower that has four-foot blades.

The turbine would produce up to 10,000 watts of electricity a year at its full output.

The wind tower would be placed about 500 feet behind the hatchery off Fish Hatchery Road in the Town of Chateaugay.

Once operational, the windmill is expected to generate enough power to meet some of the electricity needs for the Fish Hatchery's office building and hatchery house, as well as the aerators, electric feeders and nearby machine shop.

DEC expects to save 18 percent of its annual hatchery-electricity costs, or roughly $1,428 a year, by using the windmill power.

SAVINGS STUDIED

Sustainable Energy Developments Inc., a technical-service provider for the Wind Incentives for Eligible Installers Program through New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, conducted a study of the hatchery's energy use.

More than 54,250 kilowatt hours are used a year, and DEC pays... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  
An alternative-energy windmill demonstration project is being proposed by DEC's Division of Operations and the Division of Fish, Wildlife and Marine Resources to begin in the spring.

10,000 WATTS A YEAR

The plan calls for the installation of a 10-kilowatt turbine on top of a 120-foot lattice-type tower that has four-foot blades.

The turbine would produce up to 10,000 watts of electricity a year at its full output.

The wind tower would be placed about 500 feet behind the hatchery off Fish Hatchery Road in the Town of Chateaugay.

Once operational, the windmill is expected to generate enough power to meet some of the electricity needs for the Fish Hatchery's office building and hatchery house, as well as the aerators, electric feeders and nearby machine shop.

DEC expects to save 18 percent of its annual hatchery-electricity costs, or roughly $1,428 a year, by using the windmill power.

SAVINGS STUDIED

Sustainable Energy Developments Inc., a technical-service provider for the Wind Incentives for Eligible Installers Program through New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, conducted a study of the hatchery's energy use.

More than 54,250 kilowatt hours are used a year, and DEC pays $7,796 for its electricity.

With a windmill in use, the study states, the facility could save $119 a month or more than 18 percent a year.

The hatchery, one of 12 operated by DEC across the state, produces about 90,000 pounds of brook, brown, rainbow and lake trout a year.

STATE WILL PAY HALF

In its windmill proposal, DEC says it wants to continue exploring energy-conservation methods similar to the solar-power systems or photovoltaic units it now uses at the Quogue Wildlife Refuge on Long Island, at its central offices at 625 Broadway in Albany and at the Five Rivers Environmental Education Center in Delmar.

"Wind power currently is one of the most cost-effective technologies on the market," the study states, adding that the State Energy Research and Development Authority is also offering to pay 50 percent of the cost for small wind systems like this one under its wind-incentives program.

The study shows the cost to install the wind tower is $53,150, but with the need to pay prevailing wages and a 10-percent add-on to cover any contingencies, such as increased materials costs or design changes, the entire project cost is being set at $64,000.

With the State Energy Research and Development Authority paying half, DEC would have to come up with just $32,000 for the project.

A Chester, Conn., wind-energy producer, Noble Environmental Power, has been researching the feasibility of constructing two wind farms in the North Country: one in the Town of Malone and the other in the Town of Brandon.

Each facility would have 67 to 70 non-lattice towers that are 265 feet tall to produce energy to be sold on the national grid.

Mark Lyons, an attorney with Noble, said he was not aware of DEC's plan in Chateaugay, but said, "I think it's smart for towns to look at an abundant resource like wind for the benefit of its residents."

Noble has met strong resistance from a small group of opponents who say the wind towers would kill birds, look ugly and cause health problems in people living near them.

Calvin Martin of Malone, one of the most vocal opponents to wind-tower operations, could not be reached Tuesday for comment on the DEC plan.

Source: http://www.pressrepublican....

JAN 11 2006
https://www.windaction.org/posts/939-dec-may-place-windmill-at-chateaugay-fish-hatchery
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