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Mid-Devon Wind-Turbines: 'Add Insult to Injury'

‘The application for two 100-metre wind turbines and associated structures, at Cross Moor close to the Exmoor National Park(1), adds insult to injury, coming hot on the heels of another damaging application for nine turbines at nearby Batworthy Cross’. So declared Kate Ashbrook, general secretary of the Open Spaces Society(2), which has submitted a strong objection to North Devon District Council, the planning authority, which is considering plans from Cross Moor Devon Light and Power Ltd. The society objected to the Batworthy Cross application last December.

‘The application for two 100-metre wind turbines and associated structures, at Cross Moor close to the Exmoor National Park(1), adds insult to injury, coming hot on the heels of another damaging application for nine turbines at nearby Batworthy Cross’.

So declared Kate Ashbrook, general secretary of the Open Spaces Society(2), which has submitted a strong objection to North Devon District Council, the planning authority, which is considering plans from Cross Moor Devon Light and Power Ltd. The society objected to the Batworthy Cross application last December.

Says Kate: ‘The proposed wind-turbines at Cross Moor are in an area of immense landscape and recreational value, being only four kilometres away from the Exmoor National Park, designated because it is a top landscape. And they are only two kilometres from the Two Moors Way long-distance path across Devon, which is much used and enjoyed, by walkers in particular.

‘The proposed turbines and the paraphernalia which accompanies them will be a gross eyesore in this lovely setting, especially when viewed from the popular public-access land at East and West Anstey and Molland Commons on the south-west ridge of Exmoor. The tops of the turbines will break the skyline and the rotating blades will glint in the sun. They will be horribly visible.

‘This peaceful area of mid Devon, with its intimate landscape combined... [truncated due to possible copyright]  

‘The application for two 100-metre wind turbines and associated structures, at Cross Moor close to the Exmoor National Park(1), adds insult to injury, coming hot on the heels of another damaging application for nine turbines at nearby Batworthy Cross’.

So declared Kate Ashbrook, general secretary of the Open Spaces Society(2), which has submitted a strong objection to North Devon District Council, the planning authority, which is considering plans from Cross Moor Devon Light and Power Ltd.  The society objected to the Batworthy Cross application last December.

Says Kate:  ‘The proposed wind-turbines at Cross Moor are in an area of immense landscape and recreational value, being only four kilometres away from the Exmoor National Park, designated because it is a top landscape.  And they are only two kilometres from the Two Moors Way long-distance path across Devon, which is much used and enjoyed, by walkers in particular.

‘The proposed turbines and the paraphernalia which accompanies them will be a gross eyesore in this lovely setting, especially when viewed from the popular public-access land at East and West Anstey and Molland Commons on the south-west ridge of Exmoor.  The tops of the turbines will break the skyline and the rotating blades will glint in the sun.  They will be horribly visible.

‘This peaceful area of mid Devon, with its intimate landscape combined with wide moorland expanses, cannot accommodate such monstrosities as those proposed in the Cross Moor and Batworthy Cross applications.  The character of the area will be destroyed, along with people’s quiet enjoyment of it.  The developments will have an adverse effect on the economy of the area, which is dependent on tourism. 

‘We urge the district council to reject this damaging application, along with the one at Batworthy Cross,’ Kate concludes.

 

Notes for editors

1.   The application from Cross Moor Devon Light and Power Ltd is for two wind-turbine generators of 100 metres to top height, with transformer enclosures, substation building, anemometer, access tracks and ancillary equipment.  Cross Moor is near Knowstone, South Molton in Devon.

2.   The Open Spaces Society (formally the Commons, Open Spaces and Footpaths Preservation Society) was founded in 1865 and is Britain’s oldest national conservation body.  It campaigns to protect common land, village greens, open spaces and public paths, and people’s right to enjoy them.

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CONTACT: Kate Ashbrook 01491 573535 (work) 07771 655694 (mobile)


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MAR 9 2007
https://www.windaction.org/posts/7716-mid-devon-wind-turbines-add-insult-to-injury
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