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France to pay up to €500m for falling short of renewable energy targets

Le Monde|Perrine Mouterde|November 25, 2022
EuropeFranceTaxes & SubsidiesEnergy Policy

France is the only one of the 27 EU member states to have missed its objective for 2020, when renewable energy represented 19.1% of its consumption, below the 23% target. For failing to reach its European targets for renewable energy in 2020, which it had set itself a decade earlier, the French state will have to pay out several hundred million euros. "It will cost France €500 million this year for not having met its target for renewable energy."


France is the only one of the 27 EU member states to have missed its objective for 2020, when renewable energy represented 19.1% of its consumption, below the 23% target.

For failing to reach its European targets for renewable energy in 2020, which it had set itself a decade earlier, the French state will have to pay out several hundred million euros. "It will cost France €500 million this year for not having met its target for renewable energy," the Minister for Energy Transition told MPs on Monday, November 21, as reported by the French daily newspaper Libération. Agnès Pannier-Runacher was appearing before the commissions on economic affairs and sustainable development, as part of the review of the bill for accelerating the development …

... more [truncated due to possible copyright]

France is the only one of the 27 EU member states to have missed its objective for 2020, when renewable energy represented 19.1% of its consumption, below the 23% target.

For failing to reach its European targets for renewable energy in 2020, which it had set itself a decade earlier, the French state will have to pay out several hundred million euros. "It will cost France €500 million this year for not having met its target for renewable energy," the Minister for Energy Transition told MPs on Monday, November 21, as reported by the French daily newspaper Libération. Agnès Pannier-Runacher was appearing before the commissions on economic affairs and sustainable development, as part of the review of the bill for accelerating the development of renewable energy.

France is the only one of the 27 EU member states to have missed its goal two years ago. Renewable energy represented just 19.1% of its gross final energy consumption, well below the 23% target. As this target is binding, France must now buy "statistical amounts" of renewable energy through a European mechanism from "good performers" who have exceeded their target.

"We are negotiating to buy statistical megawatts from Italy and Sweden," said Ms. Pannier-Runacher. On Tuesday, her team said that while the final amount could well be "of the order of several hundred million euros," this had not been decided, and discussions with other member states were still ongoing.

A 'very damaging delay'

Although the statement went unnoticed at the time, Ms. Pannier-Runacher had already mentioned a sum of €500 million at the end of September, during a conference of the Renewable Energies Syndicate (SER). "If we had reached our objectives in 2020, we would have an additional volume of renewable energy of 64 TWh, which corresponds to 20% of industrial consumption," General Delegate Alexandre Roesch said. "This delay is very damaging for the state's finances but also for the security of supply as winter approaches."

While the risk of tension on the electricity grid will be high in January, France is still not on track to meet the renewable energy deployment targets set in its energy roadmap, the Multi-Annual Energy Program (PPE). Regarding onshore wind, between 1.2 and 1.3 gigawatts (GW) of new capacity will have been installed by 2022, short of the target of 1.9 GW. "The targets have never been reached since 2020, and the cumulative shortfall over the last three years is about 2 GW," Michel Gioria, general delegate of France Energie éolienne (FEE), said. The current PPE calls for 24 GW of installed capacity in 2023, while France has about 20.3 GW today.

As for the other sectors, Mr. Roesch confirms that the country is still not on the right track. "There has been fairly significant acceleration in solar, with significant levels of connections in 2021, but these are not yet sufficient," he explained. "We are also making progress on geothermal energy, but not fast enough." While the country's first offshore wind farm was fully commissioned off Saint-Nazaire, in western France, on Wednesday, France is still far behind its European neighbors.

The acceleration bill aims to "halve" the time needed to roll out these "low-carbon" energies, in particular by simplifying administrative procedures. The debate in the Assemblée Nationale will begin on December 5 and is expected to generate vivid discussion on how to allocate the value of renewable installations, protection of biodiversity, and, above all, the planning of the rollout. Some fear that the final bill will only give a very limited boost.

Translation of an original article published in French on lemonde.fr; the publisher may only be liable for the French version.


Source:https://www.lemonde.fr/en/env…

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