logo
Article

Power lines to be strung across river for Saint John wind farm project

CBC News|November 1, 2022
New BrunswickTransmission
Mysterious new power poles being installed in Saint John have been demystified. Saint John Energy says the large, cross-like structures running from the top of Reversing Falls over to the other side of the St. John River are part of the Burchill Wind Energy Project.

Mysterious new power poles being installed in Saint John have been demystified.
 
Saint John Energy says the large, cross-like structures running from the top of Reversing Falls over to the other side of the St. John River are part of the Burchill Wind Energy Project.
 
They will be used to run power lines across the river to transport the green energy from the wind farm in Lorneville to Saint John, said Jessica DeLong of Saint John Energy.
 
"This is really starting the path for us to cross the river to make sure that we are providing that green wind energy to our citizens," she said.
 
The two new "monopoles" are tall, narrow power lines, made of steel and about 90 feet (about 27½ metres) high, DeLong said. One is on Riverview Drive on the west side and one is on Chesley Drive in the north end, she said.
 
She said the land doesn't belong to Saint John Energy, but the utility works with the property owners to make sure they have permission to use that property. She did not confirm who currently ... more [truncated due to possible copyright]
     
Mysterious new power poles being installed in Saint John have been demystified.
 
Saint John Energy says the large, cross-like structures running from the top of Reversing Falls over to the other side of the St. John River are part of the Burchill Wind Energy Project.
 
They will be used to run power lines across the river to transport the green energy from the wind farm in Lorneville to Saint John, said Jessica DeLong of Saint John Energy.
 
"This is really starting the path for us to cross the river to make sure that we are providing that green wind energy to our citizens," she said.
 
The two new "monopoles" are tall, narrow power lines, made of steel and about 90 feet (about 27½ metres) high, DeLong said. One is on Riverview Drive on the west side and one is on Chesley Drive in the north end, she said.
 
She said the land doesn't belong to Saint John Energy, but the utility works with the property owners to make sure they have permission to use that property. She did not confirm who currently owns the land but said they do have permission to use it.
 
She said before the end of the month, Saint Johners should expect three lines to be hung between those two poles, about 440 metres across the river.
 
"Right now we have decided on a process that actually uses a drone that will take a smaller line across the water, and it will start to lead through those three lines," she said.
 
She said that is planned to happen before the end of the month.
 
To connect these monopoles to the rest of the grid, DeLong said the utility will be upgrading and adding power poles, including building new infrastructure along Douglas Avenue. 
 
She said this could create traffic disruptions and outages as the Douglas Avenue power lines go up.
 
"If there is any traffic disruptions or anything like that, we will let everyone know ahead of time," she said.
 
On track for 2022
 
The wind farm on the western outskirts of the city was supposed to be done by 2021 but was delayed. The project also had to add $6 million to construction costs after N.B. Power refused to allow the utility to use its nearby transmission lines.
 
The revised end date is this winter, which the utility is on track to meet, DeLong said.
 
The utility doesn't need special poles for wind-farm energy, so these will be normal high voltage distribution lines.
 
"[It's] allowing us to transport that power from the Burchill project, the wind turbines that are being installed into all of our substations that have been upgraded," she said.
 
The majority owner of the project will be Neqotkuk, formerly known as Tobique First Nation, along with the private company Natural Forces. The $95 million project is intended to generate up to 150,000 megawatt hours of electricity per year from 10 windmills, enough to replace about 15 per cent of the electricity Saint John Energy buys from N.B. Power.
 
DeLong said the project will be employing 100 people during the construction phase and create about five full-time jobs. 
 
"Saint John Energy actually has hired a new person in our control room to prepare for this renewable wind energy that's going to be coming onto our grid," she said.

Content truncated due to possible copyright. Use source link for full article.


Source:https://www.cbc.ca/news/canad…

Share this post
Follow Us
RSS:XMLAtomJSON
Donate
Stay Updated

We respect your privacy and never share your contact information. | LEGAL NOTICES

Contact Us

WindAction.org
Lisa Linowes, Executive Director
phone: 603.838.6588

Email contact

General Copyright Statement: Most of the sourced material posted to WindAction.org is posted according to the Fair Use doctrine of copyright law for non-commercial news reporting, education and discussion purposes. Some articles we only show excerpts, and provide links to the original published material. Any article will be removed by request from copyright owner, please send takedown requests to: info@windaction.org

© 2022 INDUSTRIAL WIND ACTION GROUP CORP. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
WEBSITE GENEROUSLY DONATED BY PARKERHILL TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION