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World's offshore wind plans at risk due to lack of ships

Irish Examiner|Pádraig Hoare |September 7, 2022
IrelandOffshore Wind
Ambitious global plans for offshore wind, including Ireland's 2030 targets, are at risk because of a lack of suitable ships to transport the huge infrastructure involved. To put this target in context, there are currently around 28GW of offshore wind farms in operation, 15GW of which are in the EU, with the UK a leader in the field. Globally, there are plans for 316GW by 2030, up from 57GW, WindEurope senior advisor Mattia Cecchinato said.

Ambitious global plans for offshore wind, including Ireland's 2030 targets, are at risk because of a lack of suitable ships to transport the huge infrastructure involved.
 
To put this target in context, there are currently around 28GW of offshore wind farms in operation, 15GW of which are in the EU, with the UK a leader in the field. Globally, there are plans for 316GW by 2030, up from 57GW, WindEurope senior advisor Mattia Cecchinato said.
 
However, he warned that without new turbine installation vessels being added to the current fleet by 2025, more than 3GW per year would be in jeopardy because of the lead-in time needed to bring them to fruition. Almost 15GW could be missed out in 2029 and 2030, he added.
 
There is a similar shortage of foundation installation and cable laying vessels, according to Mr Cecchinato. He added that the gaps could be filled if new vessels are ordered now. Governments must encourage and incentivise investment in such ships, he said.
 
Chief executive of Wind Energy Ireland, Noel Cunniffe, said: "“It is increasingly clear that there simply aren’t enough ... more [truncated due to possible copyright]
     
Ambitious global plans for offshore wind, including Ireland's 2030 targets, are at risk because of a lack of suitable ships to transport the huge infrastructure involved.
 
To put this target in context, there are currently around 28GW of offshore wind farms in operation, 15GW of which are in the EU, with the UK a leader in the field. Globally, there are plans for 316GW by 2030, up from 57GW, WindEurope senior advisor Mattia Cecchinato said.
 
However, he warned that without new turbine installation vessels being added to the current fleet by 2025, more than 3GW per year would be in jeopardy because of the lead-in time needed to bring them to fruition. Almost 15GW could be missed out in 2029 and 2030, he added.
 
There is a similar shortage of foundation installation and cable laying vessels, according to Mr Cecchinato. He added that the gaps could be filled if new vessels are ordered now. Governments must encourage and incentivise investment in such ships, he said.
 
Chief executive of Wind Energy Ireland, Noel Cunniffe, said: "“It is increasingly clear that there simply aren’t enough vessels to deliver all the offshore wind energy planned for Europe between now and the end of the decade."
 
It must be ensured that Ireland is not left behind, he added.
 
"The sooner projects can get through the planning system the sooner they can order turbines and book in the vessels they will need to build the offshore wind farms Ireland so desperately needs. 
 
"This means we need a properly resourced planning system with the personnel, skills and expertise in An Bord Pleanála to ensure applications from offshore wind farms are not waiting so long that by the time they get planning permission, there is no one available to build them.”
 
Wind Energy Ireland's report for August shows that wind energy provided 20% of Ireland’s electricity in the month, meaning it mean has supplied just under a third of Ireland’s electricity demand this year so far.
 
The volume of electricity produced by wind energy increased by 4% over the same month last year but the share of demand remained the same as demand for power also rose, the report said.
 
Wind energy pushes electricity prices down and helps to insulate Irish families and businesses from rising fossil-fuel prices, the organisation said.
 
"While figures in August are lower than the record months for wind earlier this year, it is in line with seasonal expectations and we are still on track for a strong performance from wind energy in 2022. It is also important to note that the actual amount of electricity produced by wind last month was 4% up on August 2021 and helped to meet rising demand for electricity.
 
“Our latest report shows that even in months with lower output, wind energy still plays a crucial role in shielding customers from the worst of the fossil fuel-driven increases in wholesale electricity prices," Mr Cunniffe said.
 
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Source:https://www.msn.com/en-ie/new…

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