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Conference to focus on mountain issues

RANGELEY -- From wind power to housing developments, bio-diversity to acid rain, conservation to jobs -- the pressures on Maine's mountains are increasing and policy makers, the business community and the public need to be remember the environmental needs of the mountains themselves, say organizers of a major upcoming conference. The Maine Mountain Conference on Saturday, Oct. 21, is being held at Saddleback Mountain resort's new base lodge with its dramatic vistas of the western mountains. Organizers expect more than 200 people to attend to hear speakers, scientists, historians, planners, residents and outdoor advocates talk about the significance and the future of the mountains.

RANGELEY -- From wind power to housing developments, bio-diversity to acid rain, conservation to jobs -- the pressures on Maine's mountains are increasing and policy makers, the business community and the public need to be remember the environmental needs of the mountains themselves, say organizers of a major upcoming conference.

The Maine Mountain Conference on Saturday, Oct. 21, is being held at Saddleback Mountain resort's new base lodge with its dramatic vistas of the western mountains. Organizers expect more than 200 people to attend to hear speakers, scientists, historians, planners, residents and outdoor advocates talk about the significance and the future of the mountains.

Registration is $35 for the day and sign-up is requested by Saturday. There are 25 scholarships available on a first-come basis. Sponsors of this historic conference include environmental, civic and conservation organizations, from the Appalachian Mountain Club and Maine Audubon Society to the Tumbledown Conservation Alliance and Rangeley Lake Heritage Trust.

The first Maine Mountain Conference was held 34 years ago and helped guide the newly formed Maine Land Use Regulation Commission prepare a comprehensive plan... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

RANGELEY -- From wind power to housing developments, bio-diversity to acid rain, conservation to jobs -- the pressures on Maine's mountains are increasing and policy makers, the business community and the public need to be remember the environmental needs of the mountains themselves, say organizers of a major upcoming conference.

The Maine Mountain Conference on Saturday, Oct. 21, is being held at Saddleback Mountain resort's new base lodge with its dramatic vistas of the western mountains. Organizers expect more than 200 people to attend to hear speakers, scientists, historians, planners, residents and outdoor advocates talk about the significance and the future of the mountains.

Registration is $35 for the day and sign-up is requested by Saturday. There are 25 scholarships available on a first-come basis. Sponsors of this historic conference include environmental, civic and conservation organizations, from the Appalachian Mountain Club and Maine Audubon Society to the Tumbledown Conservation Alliance and Rangeley Lake Heritage Trust.

The first Maine Mountain Conference was held 34 years ago and helped guide the newly formed Maine Land Use Regulation Commission prepare a comprehensive plan to protect the land and mountains in the unorganized territory, said Richard Fecteau, a member of the conference organizing committee.

The same concerns have returned as the commission prepares to consider altering its zoning protections of mountain tops above 2,700 feet, he said.

"We want to keep those protections that have been in place since 1972 in the face of growing demands of wind power, mineral explorations and housing developments," he said.

Committee member Bob Weingarten of Vienna said the conference will "remind policy makers, public interest groups, and the general citizenry why Maine's mountains were given protection in the 1970s and review and assess the value and usefulness of the protections now in place."

"We learned from those 1972 proceedings and subsequent research of the importance and influence of the first conference in initiating and supporting the mountain-protection zone concept," he said.

"Was there now some institutional-memory deficit occurring, given the onslaught of new proposals to rezone the mountains to accommodate development?" he asked.

To register and find additional information online go to www.matlt.org or call Fecteau at 207-778-0870.

Betty Jespersen -- 778-6991

bjespersen@centralmaine.com


Source: http://morningsentinel.main...

OCT 6 2006
https://www.windaction.org/posts/5088-conference-to-focus-on-mountain-issues
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