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Thousands of jobs in the wind farm industry could be lost

Opposition to onshore wind farms is hardening and becoming more effective. In 2005, only 29 per cent of onshore projects were refused planning permission, but this rose to 33 per cent in 2009 and 48 per cent last year.

Thousands of jobs in the wind farm industry could be lost and Britain may fail to meet new climate change targets for 2020 under tough new planning proposals.

Renewable UK, which represents the wind farm industry, said the possible introduction of local referendums in the Localism Bill could cause massive delays and lead to thousands of projects being abandoned.

Robert Norris, head of communications at Renewable UK, said: ‘We believe planning should be excluded from such referendums as there is a danger they might be routinely and frequently used as a tool by our opponents to delay any onshore wind farm applications.

‘Such referendums would have a potentially catastrophic impact on the industry as they could delay projects for at least 18 months.'

Under the Localism Bill, now nearing the Report Stage in the House of Lords, an initial six months would be allowed to determine whether enough signatures have been collected for a referendum on a wind farm proposal (five per cent of the local population) and a further 12 months is specified as the limit within which it must be held by the local authority.

Wind farm operators are waiting on... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Thousands of jobs in the wind farm industry could be lost and Britain may fail to meet new climate change targets for 2020 under tough new planning proposals.

Renewable UK, which represents the wind farm industry, said the possible introduction of local referendums in the Localism Bill could cause massive delays and lead to thousands of projects being abandoned.

Robert Norris, head of communications at Renewable UK, said: ‘We believe planning should be excluded from such referendums as there is a danger they might be routinely and frequently used as a tool by our opponents to delay any onshore wind farm applications.

‘Such referendums would have a potentially catastrophic impact on the industry as they could delay projects for at least 18 months.'

Under the Localism Bill, now nearing the Report Stage in the House of Lords, an initial six months would be allowed to determine whether enough signatures have been collected for a referendum on a wind farm proposal (five per cent of the local population) and a further 12 months is specified as the limit within which it must be held by the local authority.

Wind farm operators are waiting on average for two years to get projects approved and nearly half of all applications are turned down.

Opposition to onshore wind farms is hardening and becoming more effective. In 2005, only 29 per cent of onshore projects were refused planning permission, but this rose to 33 per cent in 2009 and 48 per cent last year.

Mr Norris said: ‘Wind farm developers could find that pursuing their applications becomes utterly impractical. For some developers, this could be the last straw.'


Source: http://www.thisismoney.co.u...

OCT 1 2011
https://www.windaction.org/posts/32079-thousands-of-jobs-in-the-wind-farm-industry-could-be-lost
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