Article

Wind project planned in lake

Trillium seeking site off Belleville - 140 giant turbines worth $1 billion

A Toronto company wants to erect more than 140 massive wind turbines down the middle of Lake Ontario in what would become the largest wind farm in North America.

Trillium Power Energy Corp. told the Toronto Star that it is in the process of getting government approvals for a 710-megawatt project, called Trillium Power Wind 1, which at full output would provide enough clean electricity to power more than 200,000 homes.

John Kourtoff, president and chief executive officer of Trillium, said the five-megawatt turbines would be in waters no deeper than 21 metres about 15 kilometres offshore from Prince Edward County, just south of Belleville.

"If you look out on the horizon, you'll barely see anything on the clearest day," said Kourtoff, adding the project would cost more than $1 billion. "We already have the financial backers."

By going offshore, the company plans to take advantage of better wind conditions, based on 36 years of wind data.

Kourtoff said the turbine bases would help support aquatic life, since fish and other water species tend to cluster and find sanctuary around underwater objects.... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

A Toronto company wants to erect more than 140 massive wind turbines down the middle of Lake Ontario in what would become the largest wind farm in North America.
 
Trillium Power Energy Corp. told the Toronto Star that it is in the process of getting government approvals for a 710-megawatt project, called Trillium Power Wind 1, which at full output would provide enough clean electricity to power more than 200,000 homes.
 
John Kourtoff, president and chief executive officer of Trillium, said the five-megawatt turbines would be in waters no deeper than 21 metres about 15 kilometres offshore from Prince Edward County, just south of Belleville.
 
"If you look out on the horizon, you'll barely see anything on the clearest day," said Kourtoff, adding the project would cost more than $1 billion. "We already have the financial backers."
 
By going offshore, the company plans to take advantage of better wind conditions, based on 36 years of wind data.
 
Kourtoff said the turbine bases would help support aquatic life, since fish and other water species tend to cluster and find sanctuary around underwater objects. The shallow waters also mean there is no danger of large ships hitting the structures.
 
Studies done so far indicate that the turbines would not conflict with the flight paths of birds. "There are no flyways, no aviary issues," Kourtoff said.
 
Power from the turbines would be sent back to shore through an underwater cable to Ontario Power Generation's Lennox oil-and-gas generating station near Kingston.
 
The Lennox plant has 230-kilovolt and 500-kilovolt transmission lines with enough surplus capacity to handle the additional power, so no new transmission infrastructure would be needed, Kourtoff said.
 
The project would dwarf the largest onshore projects already underway in Ontario. For example, the two phases of the $126 million Melancthon wind farm project near Shelbourne will total about 200 megawatts when complete.
 
The Erie Shores Wind Farm, west of Port Rowan, and the Prince Wind Farm, near Sault Ste. Marie, will each produce 100 megawatts. Epcor Utilities Inc.'s Kingsbridge project near Goderich will generate 40 megawatts, and another 50 megawatts will come from the Blue Highlands Wind Farm in the Blue Mountains.
 
"We would hope that our project assists Ontario in meeting its 2,700 megawatt target by 2010," said Kourtoff.
 
Only 122 megawatts of wind-generated power exists in the province today, but the Ontario Power Authority has signed contracts for 1,300 megawatts.
 
Robert Hornung, president of the Canadian Wind Energy Association, said Canada is just scratching the surface of its wind-energy potential, even though wind is expected to account for nearly 20 per cent of new electricity generation between now and 2015.
 
By 2015, Canada is expected to have 9,000 megawatts of installed wind generation, which would be about 3 per cent of the country's total capacity. "Canada's starting pretty far behind a lot of other countries, and even with the type of growth that I'm talking about, Canada will move maybe to the middle of the pack," Hornung said.
 
Trillium must still complete an environmental assessment and negotiate a long-term power supply deal with the Ontario Power Authority.


Source: http://www.thestar.com/NASA...

JUN 5 2006
https://www.windaction.org/posts/2932-wind-project-planned-in-lake
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