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Residents wary of new 'green waste' promises

Other green projects included a revolutionary new V-shaped wind turbine with blades the height of the Eiffel Tower could be moored at sea out of sight of land.

RESIDENTS would need to be convinced they would not be exploited as guinea pigs a third time before they supported green waste management at Pebsham.

That was the clear message when community interest company Generation Vie explained its scheme to an invited audience at the De La Warr Pavilion.

Environmental journalist Richard Watson, Bexhill Community Partnership chairman Martin Fisher, IT expert Jay Brewerton and engineer and surveyor Russell Smith have formed the not-for-profit company after exploring the latest green technology.

They have submitted a 23m lottery bid and are seeking 12m in business backing.

They argue that 300,000 tonnes of waste will continue to be sorted and reclaimed at Pebsham even after the tip there closes but new green technology could work both for the environment and for the public.

Architect Michael Pawlin spent seven years on the Eden Project. The scheme transformed a redundant Cornish industrial site into an ecological project said to be worth 155m a year to the local economy.

He has since worked on a Merseyside project which, by a "closed loop" process copying the way Nature works, was producing caviar.

The principle by which the Lost Gardens... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  
RESIDENTS would need to be convinced they would not be exploited as guinea pigs a third time before they supported green waste management at Pebsham.

That was the clear message when community interest company Generation Vie explained its scheme to an invited audience at the De La Warr Pavilion.

Environmental journalist Richard Watson, Bexhill Community Partnership chairman Martin Fisher, IT expert Jay Brewerton and engineer and surveyor Russell Smith have formed the not-for-profit company after exploring the latest green technology.

They have submitted a £23m lottery bid and are seeking £12m in business backing.

They argue that 300,000 tonnes of waste will continue to be sorted and reclaimed at Pebsham even after the tip there closes but new green technology could work both for the environment and for the public.

Architect Michael Pawlin spent seven years on the Eden Project. The scheme transformed a redundant Cornish industrial site into an ecological project said to be worth £155m a year to the local economy.

He has since worked on a Merseyside project which, by a "closed loop" process copying the way Nature works, was producing caviar.

The principle by which the Lost Gardens of Heligan had replicated Victorian practice to heat a pineapple house with manure could be scaled-up to produce astounding results, he said.

Sixty per cent of waste was biodegradable.

A glasshouse 15 storeys high had been blended into a hillside to maximise light.

Potential income from this scheme was £11m a year - before a single visitor was admitted.

Other green projects included a revolutionary new V-shaped wind turbine with blades the height of the Eiffel Tower could be moored at sea out of sight of land. A tidal energy project in North Wales would produce power from the waves and a sea water desalination scheme in the Canary Islands had overcome the problem of requiring massive amounts of energy.

The meeting was clearly impressed - including Pebsham resident Ken Lawrence.

But when speakers referred to "state of the art" technology he voiced neighbours' fears.

"DON'T use that term!" he told them.

Residents had been promised that state-of-the art technology would produce fuel pellets from waste with no effect on nearby homes.

But residents had suffered years of appalling smells which ended only when the plant was gutted by a fire.

Southern Water had promised that its waste treatment plant would be odourless thanks to state-of-the-art technology. But residents had had to suffer the smells from that.

Bexhill Against Landfill / Incineration chairman Nick Hollington warned that not only would Generation Vie have to convince councillors and business backers, they would first have to convince the people of Pebsham.

Speakers emphasised that money raised by the treatment of waste would be ploughed back into the community by sports and leisure schemes and a visitor centre.

Richard Watson said the project would fit within the existing brownfield waste treatment area and not impinge on the planned Countryside Park but complement it.

St Michael's Ward member Cllr Peter Fairhurst said: "You said that if the people of Pebsham didn't want it, it wouldn't happen.

"That's absolute nonsense. They didn't want the other things that have happened there."

Parts of the scheme might well fit with the countryside park. But the public he represented would have to be convinced.

Meetings are now planned in the area - including Pebsham - to explain the scheme to the public.


Source: http://www.hastingstoday.co...

MAY 9 2006
https://www.windaction.org/posts/2546-residents-wary-of-new-green-waste-promises
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