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Turbine plan for harbour

IS this a "wind"-up? A shock Stena announcement has revealed plans to erect a row of giant wind turbines along Holyhead breakwater, which could be the only way to save the crumbling harbour wall.

Stena Line met with Holyhead's town council last week to announce it is conducting a feasibility study into the introduction of five wind turbines 30 metres behind the breakwater.

The electricity generated could power a town twice the size of Holyhead.

The port managing company says revenue from the scheme would be used to maintain the historic harbour wall, which is in severe disrepair below the waterline.

Some residents have reacted angrily, saying a row of huge white turbines so close to the seaward side of the breakwater would destroy the picture-postcard view from Newry beach. There are also concerns about noise.

Reports that Stena will offer the town council apotofcash tofeedintocommunity projects as part of the controversial plan were confirmed by the company.

Port manager Wyn Parry said they wanted the community to benefit from the introduction of the turbine project, but could not confirm the amount put forward.

Stena's proposal is said to be due to rising company costs and the need to keep the breakwater from incurring further damage. Stena currently ploughs 150,000 a year into maintaining the... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  
Stena Line met with Holyhead's town council last week to announce it is conducting a feasibility study into the introduction of five wind turbines 30 metres behind the breakwater.
 
The electricity generated could power a town twice the size of Holyhead.
 
The port managing company says revenue from the scheme would be used to maintain the historic harbour wall, which is in severe disrepair below the waterline.
 
Some residents have reacted angrily, saying a row of huge white turbines so close to the seaward side of the breakwater would destroy the picture-postcard view from Newry beach. There are also concerns about noise.
 
Reports that Stena will offer the town council apotofcash tofeedintocommunity projects as part of the controversial plan were confirmed by the company.
 
Port manager Wyn Parry said they wanted the community to benefit from the introduction of the turbine project, but could not confirm the amount put forward.
 
Stena's proposal is said to be due to rising company costs and the need to keep the breakwater from incurring further damage. Stena currently ploughs £150,000 a year into maintaining the harbour wall.
 
The turbine proposal could be put before Anglesey County Council's planning committee before the end of the year but-Porth-y-Felin county councillor, Robert Llewelyn Jones, who was at the meeting last week, says his constituents are concerned about the impact of the wind turbines on the town.
 
He said: "I believe the breakwater is in a poor condition below the waterline, and if the wall was breached that would be catastrophic for Holyhead. But why has it been allowed to get into this state?
 
"There must be other ways to find the money to repair it. There should have been cash put aside to maintain it and now we're told wind turbines are the only way to save it."
 
"I have good green credentials so I'm not against wind farms in principle but this seems much too close to the town. We need more options."
 
Speaking of the proposal, Mr Parry said: "At the moment, we are looking into the possibility of introducing a limited number of turbines and have opened up discussions with the local council and other appropriate consultees, however, we have not reached any final decisions.
 
"Several ports in the UK, like Blyth and Liverpool, have already successfully introduced wind turbines onto their estates and we believe this project could deliver a vital source of much-needed income for the port. Like every business, we are facing rising costs.
 
"We have seen our business rates increase by over £1m this year, as well as significant increase in the price of utilities. Added to this and having carried out extensive surveys on the breakwater it has been identified that the historic structure will very soon require major investment in order to survive in the long-term.
 
"The income from the wind turbines is essential in helping us address the rising costs and investment needs."
 



Source: http://icnorthwales.icnetw...

APR 26 2006
https://www.windaction.org/posts/2324-turbine-plan-for-harbour
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