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Too high a price to pay

‘Wind Power Monthly' (The Editor, September 1998), the magazine for the wind industry and its supporters, actually recognized almost 11 years ago that the reason for the growing unpopularity of wind power is that a de facto heavy industry has tricked its way into unspoiled countryside in "green" disguise. The editor stated that: "Too often the public has felt duped into envisioning fairy tale wind parks in the countryside. The reality has been an abrupt awakening. Wind power stations are no parks."

‘Wind Power Monthly' (The Editor, September 1998), the magazine for the wind industry and its supporters, actually recognized almost 11 years ago that the reason for the growing unpopularity of wind power is that a de facto heavy industry has tricked its way into unspoiled countryside in "green" disguise. The editor stated that: "Too often the public has felt duped into envisioning fairy tale wind parks in the countryside. The reality has been an abrupt awakening. Wind power stations are no parks."

Aesthetic judgments are, of course, subjective and beauty is indeed in the eye of the beholder. Is a wind turbine beautiful or ugly? That is not the issue. My research shows that a wind farm is an industrial installation of significantly vast proportions and the proposed industrial turbines are well over 400 feet high (comparable to a 30-storey building). Further, the rotor of a Vestas V80 (older technology but still relevant to underline my point) turbine weighs 77,175 lbs - or a little over 35 tonnes, with a blade tip speed of 300 kph. The rotor blades sweep a surface area the size of a football field. The hole normally excavated for a turbine's foundation has a volume of 250 to 1,000 cubic yards... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

‘Wind Power Monthly' (The Editor, September 1998), the magazine for the wind industry and its supporters, actually recognized almost 11 years ago that the reason for the growing unpopularity of wind power is that a de facto heavy industry has tricked its way into unspoiled countryside in "green" disguise. The editor stated that: "Too often the public has felt duped into envisioning fairy tale wind parks in the countryside. The reality has been an abrupt awakening. Wind power stations are no parks."

Aesthetic judgments are, of course, subjective and beauty is indeed in the eye of the beholder. Is a wind turbine beautiful or ugly? That is not the issue. My research shows that a wind farm is an industrial installation of significantly vast proportions and the proposed industrial turbines are well over 400 feet high (comparable to a 30-storey building). Further, the rotor of a Vestas V80 (older technology but still relevant to underline my point) turbine weighs 77,175 lbs - or a little over 35 tonnes, with a blade tip speed of 300 kph. The rotor blades sweep a surface area the size of a football field. The hole normally excavated for a turbine's foundation has a volume of 250 to 1,000 cubic yards depending upon soil conditions.

Given that the area proposed for the New Denmark wind farm sits, for the most part, on bedrock, this excavation will certainly involve the use of high explosives (which may affect the wells and home foundations of nearby homes). The other option would be to sink anchor bolts, but, one way or another, this also involves the bedrock. In addition, the extracted material has to be discarded and replaced with sand, aggregate and cement; service roads and cable trenches need to be constructed; pylons and overhead transmission lines will have to be erected, reinforced or upgraded to connect to the grid.

Wind farms are such a recent phenomenon that it is hard to be certain of their long-term ecological impact. However, a citizens' group in the UK (‘Country Guardian', Wales) some time ago commissioned a hydrologist and a number of engineers to examine the Ovenden Moor wind farm. They found that the erection of turbines 200 feet high (half the size of those proposed for New Denmark) had cracked the bedrock, diverted natural watercourses, dried layers of peat that were likely to simply blow away and elsewhere formed deep pools of peat "soup" (fetid surface water), and they concluded that there was certain to be a knock-on effect on flora, insects and birds.

Wind power turbines may be acceptable where they are not in conflict with the scale and character of the local environment but they must not impose upon the lives of those living nearby with noise and flicker or endanger the health of residents or visitors; they must not create economic disadvantage through reduced property values; they must not damage the local economy; and they must not divide communities.

To date, however, none of these concerns has been appropriately addressed by local investors or our own government. In fact, this proposed project remains shrouded in secrecy with mysterious visitors making brief appearances escorted by investors and supporters of the proposed New Denmark project. We need to remind those involved that it is the right of citizens of rural areas to enjoy good health and an unspoiled countryside. The bottom line: the industrialisation of our community is too high a price to pay.


Source: http://victoriastar.canadae...

AUG 26 2009
https://www.windaction.org/posts/21915-too-high-a-price-to-pay
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