Article

Hole will get deeper for Entegrity

Financial troubles for Entegrity Wind will increase because dozens of turbines sold by the P.E.I.-based company have to be checked for a possible manufacturing flaw, says the firm's CEO. Last week, a judge gave the company 45 days to come up with a plan for dealing with at least $9 million in debts. ...Company CEO Jim Heath told CBC News last week that a problem with the turbines will dig the company into deeper troubles.

Financial troubles for Entegrity Wind will increase because dozens of turbines sold by the P.E.I.-based company have to be checked for a possible manufacturing flaw, says the firm's CEO.

Last week, a judge gave the company 45 days to come up with a plan for dealing with at least $9 million in debts.

For a time, Entegrity was a success story. It has sold 130 turbines since it opened in 2002.

Company CEO Jim Heath told CBC News last week that a problem with the turbines will dig the company into deeper troubles.

Heath said a fitting on some of these machines is too tight. In certain wind conditions, it can put too much pressure on the turbine's gear system, damaging the machine.

"We diagnosed it, and we found if we just relaxed that fitting slightly, we could eliminate the problem," he said.

Entegrity technicians were in the midst of fine-tuning the 78 turbines, which are spread across North America. Then the company started having financial trouble. With 51 turbines still requiring inspection and potential repair, the work stopped. There was not enough cash to do the retrofits.

Of those turbines still requiring inspection, 25 are not producing power, shut... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Financial troubles for Entegrity Wind will increase because dozens of turbines sold by the P.E.I.-based company have to be checked for a possible manufacturing flaw, says the firm's CEO.

Last week, a judge gave the company 45 days to come up with a plan for dealing with at least $9 million in debts.

For a time, Entegrity was a success story. It has sold 130 turbines since it opened in 2002.

Company CEO Jim Heath told CBC News last week that a problem with the turbines will dig the company into deeper troubles.

Heath said a fitting on some of these machines is too tight. In certain wind conditions, it can put too much pressure on the turbine's gear system, damaging the machine.

"We diagnosed it, and we found if we just relaxed that fitting slightly, we could eliminate the problem," he said.

Entegrity technicians were in the midst of fine-tuning the 78 turbines, which are spread across North America. Then the company started having financial trouble. With 51 turbines still requiring inspection and potential repair, the work stopped. There was not enough cash to do the retrofits.

Of those turbines still requiring inspection, 25 are not producing power, shut down at Heath's request. Entegrity has agreed to pay for any lost power while these machines sit idle, a tally that increases every day technicians can't get to them.

"Some other companies might have just gone ahead and run the machines until they could get them fixed. I chose not to do it," Heath said.

The plan is to have most of the 25 turbines that are down working again by the end of September, with all fixed by year end. By that time, the cost to the company for lost power will grow to about $200,000.

If Entegrity survives possible bankruptcy, that outstanding bill will be paid as well.

If Entegrity does go bankrupt, the job of fixing some of the turbines will become some other company's, and the cost for lost power will rest with the companies and communities that bought the turbines.


Source: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/pr...

AUG 25 2009
https://www.windaction.org/posts/21902-hole-will-get-deeper-for-entegrity
back to top