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Turbines drive away wildlife

Mr Scott, a life-long member of the RSPB, said the farmers had prided themselves on nurturing wildlife, and in particular birds, on their farms. And he said the area boasted an array of rarer species of birds including Bitterns, Green Plovers, Marsh Harriers and even migrating Quails. But since the arrival of the wind farm the birdlife has diminished and the hundreds of Bewick and Whooper swans that used to winter on the farmland have disappeared. Mr Scott and Mr Clark believe the effect the turbines have on wildlife is being covered up by developers eager to build even more of the windmills.

Farmers living close to the wind farm at Coldham are demanding an independent wildlife survey before proposals to build seven more turbines get the go-ahead.

John Scott, whose family have farmed at Bottom Laddus Farm since 1939, and Chris Clark, whose family have been at Lower Corner Farm for generations, claim the turbines put up by the Co-Op at Coldham have driven rare birds from the area.

Mr Scott, a life-long member of the RSPB, said the farmers had prided themselves on nurturing wildlife, and in particular birds, on their farms. And he said the area boasted an array of rarer species of birds including Bitterns, Green Plovers, Marsh Harriers and even migrating Quails.

But since the arrival of the wind farm the birdlife has diminished and the hundreds of Bewick and Whooper swans that used to winter on the farmland have disappeared.

Mr Scott and Mr Clark believe the effect the turbines have on wildlife is being covered up by developers eager to build even more of the windmills.

Mr Scott said a wildlife impact report had been prepared but it had been written by someone employed by the Co-Op. He believes an independent survey should be carried out before any decision... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

Farmers living close to the wind farm at Coldham are demanding an independent wildlife survey before proposals to build seven more turbines get the go-ahead.

John Scott, whose family have farmed at Bottom Laddus Farm since 1939, and Chris Clark, whose family have been at Lower Corner Farm for generations, claim the turbines put up by the Co-Op at Coldham have driven rare birds from the area.

Mr Scott, a life-long member of the RSPB, said the farmers had prided themselves on nurturing wildlife, and in particular birds, on their farms. And he said the area boasted an array of rarer species of birds including Bitterns, Green Plovers, Marsh Harriers and even migrating Quails.

But since the arrival of the wind farm the birdlife has diminished and the hundreds of Bewick and Whooper swans that used to winter on the farmland have disappeared.

Mr Scott and Mr Clark believe the effect the turbines have on wildlife is being covered up by developers eager to build even more of the windmills.

Mr Scott said a wildlife impact report had been prepared but it had been written by someone employed by the Co-Op. He believes an independent survey should be carried out before any decision is made.

Both men are also concerned about the impact additional turbines will have on their homes and farms and complain the turbines cause noise, flickering and shadowing.

Mr Clark claims the noise generated by the existing turbines is so loud when the wind is in a certain direction it can be heard through his double glazing and is especially bad at night.

"Some nights it's impossible to get a proper night's sleep the noise is so bad. The turbines sort of reverberate," he said.

Mr Scott claims flickering causes problems for workers using complicated farm machinery and is warning there could be an accident as the flickering makes it difficult to concentrate.
Both men want those responsible for building wind turbines to acknowledge the problems they cause.

"The trouble is they deny the turbines make any noise. They don't accept they cause flickering or shadowing and they deny the problems they cause to wildlife. We just want people to be honest and upfront and admit the truth," said Mr Scott.

Brian Warby, whose home near Outwell is set to be overshadowed by 12 turbines if the controversial Marshland Wind Farm gets the go-ahead, has seconded everything the two men have said.

He believes the proposed 139 metre high turbines will dominate the landscape close to his smallholding and is worried that his home will suffer the same problems currently faced by those living near the Coldham turbines.
"People have got to realise the truth about these things," he said.

n At a meeting of Fenland's planning committee on Wednesday the wind turbine applications, for Coldham and for a single windmill at Creek Fen in March, were deferred for 6-7 weeks.

Members had concerns, in relation to the Anglian Water Authority application for Creek Fen, regarding the affect on horses at the Equestrian Centre nearby.

The full article contains 518 words and appears in n/a newspaper.Last Updated: 17 March 2008 4:36 PM

"When wind farm developers do surveys to assess the suitability of a site they measure the audible range of noise but never the infrasound measurement - the low-frequency noise that causes vibrations that you can feel through your feet and chest.

"This frequency resonates with the human body - their effect being dependent on body shape. There are those on whom there is virtually no effect, but others for whom it is incredibly disturbing."

A report by Dr Geoff Leventhall, a fellow of the Institute of Physics and Institute of Acoustics, has endorsed the findings. "Low-frequency noise causes extreme distress to a number of people who are sensitive to its effects," it says.

The claims have sparked an inquiries by the British Wind Energy Association and the Department of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which has commissioned scientists at Salford University to research the effects of wind turbines on human health.

There are more than 1,000 turbines on 80 wind farms around Britain. They have rapidly increased in number during the past decade as a result of the Government's aim of getting 10 per cent of Britain's energy needs from renewable sources by 2010. To meet that target, there would have to be at least 5,000 turbines.

In Denmark, where wind turbines were introduced as long as 30 years ago, the government has responded to public demand and stopped erecting onshore turbines because of the noise hazard.

Dr Stephen Briggs, an archaeologist who lives in the village of Llangwryfron in West Wales, initially welcomed the news that 20 turbines were to be built in the hills behind his home.

He said: "I'm as green as the next man and the developers assured us that the windmills would cause hardly any disturbance, but once they began operating I couldn't work in my garden any more - the noise was unbearable. It was as if someone was mixing cement in the sky."

Two neighbours became ill from a lack of sleep and after four years of frustrated appeals, the Briggs family left their home of 17 years. House prices near to wind farms have also plummeted.

Mark Taplin, who has lived close to a wind farm near Truro in Cornwall for almost a decade, said: "It has been a miserable, horrible experience. They are 440 metres away but if I step outside and they are not generating I know immediately because I can hear the silence. They grind you down - you can't get away from them. They make you very depressed - the chomp and swoosh of the blades creates a noise that beggars belief."

National Wind Power, a company that builds turbines, recommends that they are erected at least 600 yards from human habitation, but government planning guidelines allow them to be put up just 400 yards from houses.

Alison Hill, the communications manager for the British Wind Association, said: "Wind farms make people feel better - they are a visible evidence of a cleaner, better future. However, we are currently doing research into the health impact of the turbines and shall be publishing the results within the next six months."


Source: http://www.fenlandcitizen.c...

MAR 17 2008
https://www.windaction.org/posts/13894-turbines-drive-away-wildlife
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