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Villagers reject windfarm plans

PARISH councillors this week unanimously rejected contentious plans to four wind turbines between Ormesby St Margaret and Hemsby - citing risks to aircraft and migrating geese, as well as being blots on the landscape. Members of Ormesby St Margaret Parish Council voted against the scheme to set up the 415ft towering turbines between the two villages.

PARISH councillors this week unanimously rejected contentious plans to four wind turbines between Ormesby St Margaret and Hemsby - citing risks to aircraft and migrating geese, as well as being blots on the landscape.

Members of Ormesby St Margaret Parish Council voted against the scheme to set up the 415ft towering turbines between the two villages.

Monday night's decision is the first council rejection of the SLP Energy application, which aims to build the turbines to generate 10 mega watts of green sustainable power for 5,500 homes.

A special planning meeting called by the parish council heard that villagers were against the scheme because the structures would dominate the skyline and affect TV reception.

Chairman Geoff Freeman said the turbines were 100ft taller than Norwich Cathedral and would dwarf the village's parish church.

He said: "What we have actually got here is an application to build four quite massive structures right on the horizon of our landscape."

Councillors said they understood the need for environmentally-friendly power... more [truncated due to possible copyright]  

PARISH councillors this week unanimously rejected contentious plans to four wind turbines between Ormesby St Margaret and Hemsby - citing risks to aircraft and migrating geese, as well as being blots on the landscape.

Members of Ormesby St Margaret Parish Council voted against the scheme to set up the 415ft towering turbines between the two villages.

Monday night's decision is the first council rejection of the SLP Energy application, which aims to build the turbines to generate 10 mega watts of green sustainable power for 5,500 homes.

A special planning meeting called by the parish council heard that villagers were against the scheme because the structures would dominate the skyline and affect TV reception.

Chairman Geoff Freeman said the turbines were 100ft taller than Norwich Cathedral and would dwarf the village's parish church.

He said: "What we have actually got here is an application to build four quite massive structures right on the horizon of our landscape."

Councillors said they understood the need for environmentally-friendly power but concerns were raised that by objecting to the plan they could be seen as pariahs by putting the interests of villagers before the environment.

Borough councillor Jim Shrimplin said: "They (SLP) are a commercial organisation making a profit, but they come across as if they were the saviours of the world."

Councillors also expressed concerns that the turbines could pose a risk to flying aircraft and migrating geese.

John Leadbeater said the turbines were close to Trinity Broads where geese migrated to and from Holland and the birds could be "chopped up" by the blades.

A straw poll of the 10 residents who attended the meeting revealed that not one of them was in favour of the turbine scheme.

Hemsby Parish Council was due to discuss the application last night and its chairman Bob Reynolds said opinion in the village was evenly split. Representatives from SLP were due to attend the meeting.

SLP, which has built the 126m turbine Gulliver in Lowestoft, submitted the plans to Great Yarmouth Borough Council last month and the company sent out 7,000 invites to a public exhibition at Hemsby.

If approved by the borough, SLP hopes to start work on the windfarm next year.

A green energy champion is setting up a wind experiment in his own village to see if there are enough gusts and squalls to power more than 1,000 homes. Andy Hilton was due to install a 60m test mast in Catfield this week to ascertain whether the region has sufficient wind to power a planned 130m wind turbine.

Mr Hilton, who runs Windpower Renewables, was the project manager on two of Britain's largest wind farms, including Scroby Sands.

The next stage of his green power crusade will see the father-of-three try to set up a £2.5m wind turbine in Catfield.

Mr Hilton's test mast at the site of the old Bailey's greenhouses will spend the next year collecting wind power data and if there is sufficient power then a planning application will be put in to North Norfolk District Council to construct the main turbine.

A public meeting has been held in the village and despite some opposition to the turbine scheme Mr Hilton has described residents' reaction as positive.

 


Source: http://www.greatyarmouthmer...

SEP 27 2007
https://www.windaction.org/posts/11211-villagers-reject-windfarm-plans
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